Monthly Archives: March 2013

David Stockman: We’ve Been Lied To, Robbed, And Misled

And we’re still at risk of it happening all over again

by Adam Taggart
Saturday, March 30, 2013, 12:42 PM

Then, when the Fed’s fire hoses started spraying an elephant soup of liquidity injections in every direction and its balance sheet grew by $1.3 trillion in just thirteen weeks compared to $850 billion during its first ninety-four years, I became convinced that the Fed was flying by the seat of its pants, making it up as it went along. It was evident that its aim was to stop the hissy fit on Wall Street and that the thread of a Great Depression 2.0 was just a cover story for a panicked spree of money printing that exceeded any other episode in recorded human history.

David Stockman, The Great Deformation

David Stockman, former director of the OMB under President Reagan, former US Representative, and veteran financier is an insider’s insider. Few people understand the ways in which both Washington DC and Wall Street work and intersect better than he does.

In his upcoming book, The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America, Stockman lays out how we have devolved from a free market economy into a managed one that operates for the benefit of a privileged few. And when trouble arises, these few are bailed out at the expense of the public good.

By manipulating the price of money through sustained and historically low interest rates, Greenspan and Bernanke created an era of asset mis-pricing that inevitably would need to correct.  And when market forces attempted to do so in 2008, Paulson et al hoodwinked the world into believing the repercussions would be so calamitous for all that the institutions responsible for the bad actions that instigated the problem needed to be rescued — in full — at all costs.

Of course, history shows that our markets and economy would have been better off had the system been allowed to correct. Most of the “too big to fail” institutions would have survived or been broken into smaller, more resilient, entities. For those that would have failed, smaller, more responsible banks would have stepped up to replace them – as happens as part of the natural course of a free market system:

Essentially there was a cleansing run on the wholesale funding market in the canyons of Wall Street going on. It would have worked its will, just like JP Morgan allowed it to happen in 1907 when we did not have the Fed getting in the way. Because they stopped it in its tracks after the AIG bailout and then all the alphabet soup of different lines that the Fed threw out, and then the enactment of TARP, the last two investment banks standing were rescued, Goldman and Morgan [Stanley], and they should not have been. As a result of being rescued and having the cleansing liquidation of rotten balance sheets stopped, within a few weeks and certainly months they were back to the same old games, such that Goldman Sachs got $10 billion dollars for the fiscal year that started three months later after that check went out, which was October 2008. For the fiscal 2009 year, Goldman Sachs generated what I call a $29 billion surplus – $13 billion of net income after tax, and on top of that $16 billion of salaries and bonuses, 95% of it which was bonuses.

Therefore, the idea that they were on death’s door does not stack up. Even if they had been, it would not make any difference to the health of the financial system. These firms are supposed to come and go, and if people make really bad bets, if they have a trillion dollar balance sheet with six, seven, eight hundred billion dollars worth of hot-money short-term funding, then they ought to take their just reward, because it would create lessons, it would create discipline. So all the new firms that would have been formed out of the remnants of Goldman Sachs where everybody lost their stock values – which for most of these partners is tens of millions, hundreds of millions – when they formed a new firm, I doubt whether they would have gone back to the old game. What happened was the Fed stopped everything in its tracks, kept Goldman Sachs intact, the reckless Goldman Sachs and the reckless Morgan Stanley, everyone quickly recovered their stock value and the game continues. This is one of the evils that comes from this kind of deep intervention in the capital and money markets.

Stockman’s anger at the unnecessary and unfair capital transfer from taxpayer to TBTF bank is matched only by his concern that, even with those bailouts, the banking system is still unacceptably vulnerable to a repeat of the same crime:

The banks quickly worked out their solvency issues because the Fed basically took it out of the hides of Main Street savers and depositors throughout America. When the Fed panicked, it basically destroyed the free-market interest rate – you cannot have capitalism, you cannot have healthy financial markets without an interest rate, which is the price of money, the price of capital that can freely measure and reflect risk and true economic prospects.

Well, once you basically unplug the pricing mechanism of a capital market and make it entirely an administered rate by the Fed, you are going to cause all kinds of deformations as I call them, or mal-investments as some of the Austrians used to call them, that basically pollutes and corrupts the system. Look at the deposit rate right now, it is 50 basis points, maybe 40, for six months. As a result of that, probably $400-500 billion a year is being transferred as a fiscal maneuver by the Fed from savers to the banks. They are collecting the spread, they’ve then booked the profits, they’ve rebuilt their book net worth, and they paid back the TARP basically out of what was thieved from the savers of America.

Now they go down and pound the table and whine and pout like JP Morgan and the rest of them, you have to let us do stock buy backs, you have to let us pay out dividends so we can ramp our stock and collect our stock option winnings. It is outrageous that the authorities, after the so-called “near death experience” of 2008 and this massive fiscal safety net and monetary safety net was put out there, is allowing them to pay dividends and to go into the market and buy back their stock. They should be under house arrest in a sense that every dime they are making from this artificial yield group being delivered by the Fed out of the hides of savers should be put on their balance sheet to build up retained earnings, to build up a cushion. I do not care whether it is fifteen or twenty or twenty-five percent common equity and retained earnings-to-assets or not, that is what we should be doing if we are going to protect the system from another raid by these people the next time we get a meltdown, which can happen at any time.

You can see why I talk about corruption, why crony capitalism is so bad. I mean, the Basel capital standards, they are a joke. We are just allowing the banks to go back into the same old game they were playing before. Everybody said the banks in late 2007 were the greatest thing since sliced bread. The market cap of the ten largest banks in America, including from Bear Stearns all the way to Citibank and JP Morgan and Goldman and so forth, was $1.25 trillion. That was up thirty times from where the predecessors of those institutions had been. Only in 1987, when Greenspan took over and began the era of bubble finance – slowly at first then rapidly, eventually, to have the market cap grow thirty times – and then on the eve of the great meltdown see the $1.25 trillion to market cap disappear, vanish, vaporize in panic in September 2008. Only a few months later, $1 trillion of that market cap disappeared in to the abyss and panic, and Bear Stearns is going down, and all the rest.

This tells you the system is dramatically unstable. In a healthy financial system and a free capital market, if I can put it that way, you are not going to have stuff going from nowhere to @1.2 trillion and then back to a trillion practically at the drop of a hat. That is instability; that is a case of a medicated market that is essentially very dangerous and is one of the many adverse consequences and deformations that result from the central-bank dominated, corrupt monetary system that has slowly built up ever since Nixon closed the gold window, but really as I say in my book, going back to 1933 in April when Roosevelt took all the private gold. So we are in a big dead-end trap, and they are digging deeper every time you get a new maneuver.

Source

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Chevron Strikes Oil at Coronado Prospect in U.S. Gulf of Mexico

Chevron Corporation has announced an oil discovery at the Coronado prospect in the deepwater U.S. Gulf of Mexico.

The Walker Ridge Block 98 Well No. 1 encountered more than 400 feet (122 m) of net pay. The well is located approximately 190 miles (308 km) off the Louisiana coast in 6,127 feet (1,868 m) of water and was drilled to a depth of 31,866 feet (9,713 m).

“The Coronado discovery demonstrates how Chevron is achieving its strategy of superior exploration performance,” said George Kirkland, vice chairman, Chevron Corporation. “The discovery adds to our global portfolio of high-quality opportunities for future growth.”

“The Coronado discovery continues our string of exploration successes in the Lower Tertiary Trend, where Chevron is advancing multiple projects,” said Gary Luquette, president, Chevron North America Exploration and Production Company. “It also highlights the importance of the deepwater Gulf of Mexico as a source of domestic energy for the United States.”

The well results are still being evaluated, and additional work is needed to determine the extent of the resource. Chevron, with a 40 percent working interest in the prospect, is the operator of the Coronado discovery well. Other owners are ConocoPhillips with 35 percent, a subsidiary of Anadarko Petroleum Corporation with 15 percent and Venari Offshore LLC with 10 percent.

Chevron is one of the largest leaseholders in the Gulf of Mexico and is currently constructing the Jack/St. Malo and Big Foot projects, which are scheduled to begin production in 2014.The company is also conducting appraisal activities at its previously announced Buckskin and Moccasin discoveries, also in the Lower Tertiary Trend.

Chevron Strikes Oil at Coronado Prospect in U.S. Gulf of Mexico| Offshore Energy Today.

GoM: FMC Technologies Wins Subsea Equipment Order

FMC Technologies, Inc. announced today that it has received a subsea equipment order from LLOG Exploration Company, LLC (LLOG Exploration) for the Who Dat field. The order has an estimated value of $30 million in revenue.

The project is located in the Gulf of Mexico Mississippi Canyon Block 503 in water depths of approximately 3200 feet (975 meters). FMC Technologies’ scope of supply includes subsea trees, a subsea manifold, multiphase meters and a subsea distribution system. The equipment is scheduled for delivery in 2013.

“FMC Technologies is pleased to have been chosen by LLOG Exploration to provide subsea systems for its continued development of the Who Dat field,” said Tore Halvorsen, FMC Technologies’ Senior Vice President, Subsea Technologies. “We welcome the opportunity to continue supporting LLOG Exploration with its Gulf of Mexico developments.”

Subsea World News – FMC Technologies Wins Subsea Equipment Order (USA).

Cobalt Reports ‘Exceptional’ Results from Its Gulf of Mexico Wells

Cobalt International Energy, Inc. on Tuesday announced extraordinary results from its Shenandoah #2R appraisal well, located in Walker Ridge Block 51, and provided an update on its North Platte #1 exploratory well, located in Garden Banks 959, both located in the Inboard Lower Tertiary Trend, deepwater Gulf of Mexico.

At Shenandoah, the well’s operator announced today that the Shenandoah #2R appraisal well encountered more than 1,000 net feet of oil pay in multiple high quality Lower Tertiary-aged reservoirs. Log and pressure data from both the Shenandoah appraisal well and the 2009 Shenandoah discovery well indicate the presence of exceptionally high quality reservoirs and hydrocarbons.

The appraisal well was drilled as a straight hole to a total depth of 31,405 feet in approximately 5,800 feet of water, about 1.3 miles southwest and approximately 1,700 feet structurally down-dip from the Shenandoah #1 discovery well, in order to test the down-dip extent of the Shenandoah field. Well results indicate that the targeted sands were full to base with no evidence of oil-water contacts. The Shenandoah #1 discovery well was drilled in early 2009 on Walker Ridge Block 52 and encountered more than 300 net feet of Inboard Lower Tertiary oil pay.

North Platte #1

Cobalt, as operator, provided an update confirming that the North Platte #1 exploratory well encountered over 550 net feet of oil pay in multiple high quality Inboard Lower Tertiary reservoirs. This compares to DeGolyer and MacNaughton’s pre-drill estimate for net pay of 350 feet. North Platte is located in approximately 4,400 feet of water and was drilled to a total depth of approximately 34,500 feet. Cobalt completed a bypass coring operation on North Platte #1 and has since temporarily abandoned the discovery well. In addition, Cobalt has begun the acquisition of a new state-of-the-art 3D seismic survey over the greater North Platte field and the majority of its prospects in the immediate area. Evaluation of this data will be ongoing throughout 2013. Appraisal plans for North Platte will be determined later in the year, as well.

Cobalt is currently drilling its Ardennes #1 exploratory well in Green Canyon 896. Ardennes is targeting both Miocene and Inboard Lower Tertiary reservoirs. Results are expected sometime mid-year 2013. DeGolyer and MacNaughton estimates Ardennes to have potential resources greater than 500 million barrels gross oil equivalent.

“The exceptional results of both the Shenandoah #2R appraisal well and the North Platte #1 exploratory well further substantiate our regional model of the prolific potential of the Inboard Lower Tertiary Trend,” said Joseph H. Bryant, Cobalt’s Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. “We believe that our material working interests in these two significant Inboard Lower Tertiary fields will be the source of tremendous value for our shareholders. Our deep portfolio of prospects on trend with these two fields bodes well for our future growth in the Gulf of Mexico. These recent results and our bright future are a testament to our commitment to the people and technology required to succeed in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico subsalt trends.”

Cobalt is the operator and holds a 60 percent working interest in North Platte. TOTAL E&P USA, INC.  is Cobalt’s partner in North Platte with a 40 percent working interest. Cobalt is the operator and holds a 42 percent working interest in Ardennes. Partners in Ardennes include ConocoPhillips (30 percent working interest) and TOTAL E&P USA, INC. (28 percent working interest). In Shenandoah, Cobalt holds a 20 percent working interest. Partners in Shenandoah include Anadarko Petroleum Corporation , as operator (30 percent working interest), ConocoPhillips (30 percent working interest), Venari Resources LLC (10 percent working interest) and Marathon Oil Company (10 percent working interest).

Cobalt Reports ‘Exceptional’ Results from Its Gulf of Mexico Wells| Offshore Energy Today.

GoM: BP Orders Subsea Systems for Mad Dog Field from FMC Technologies

FMC Technologies, Inc. announced today that it has signed a contract with BP for the manufacture and supply of subsea equipment to support the Mad Dog Phase 2 field development.

The Mad Dog Phase 2 field development is located near Green Canyon Block 825 of the Gulf of Mexico, 150 miles (240 kilometers) south of New Orleans in about 5,100 feet (1,550 meters) of water. Under the initial contract, FMC Technologies will supply subsea trees, manifolds, and jumper equipment.

“Mad Dog Phase 2 is the first project awarded under our global agreement with BP to provide technologies and services for their worldwide subsea development projects,” said Tore Halvorsen , FMC Technologies’ Senior Vice President, Subsea Technologies. “We have a long history of supporting BP’s global offshore technology requirements, and today’s announcement expands our support of their Gulf of Mexico projects.”

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