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Heavily In Debt Millennials Now Must Foot The Federal Deficit Bill Too

By Evan Feinberg

Millennials were born free, but everywhere we’re now in chains. The culprit is the skyrocketing national debt levels of the past decade, which have hurt young Americans and Millennials more than anyone else. We’re already facing enough personal debts as it is — and now we’re being asked to pay for everyone else’s.

Our debts start close to home. Today, the average college graduate is trying to pay down $35,200 in student loan debt. If that weren’t bad enough, we’re also looking at a job-market with near-record 16% unemployment rate for 18-29 year olds. That means we have more bills than ever — and fewer jobs to pay them off.

With such burdens, it’s hard for us to plan for the future. But our personal debt problems pale in comparison to the one that politicians are foisting upon us with out-of-control spending in Washington. The national debt, which now clocks in at nearly $17 trillion, continues to grow.

And just like our student loans, we’re going to be stuck with paying the bill.

Unfortunately, paying down these debts becomes harder with every passing day. Our debt to gross domestic product ratio now exceeds 100% — which means our government has produced more debt than the entire American economy produces useful commodities each year. Politically easy proposals such as “taxing the rich” can’t fix this crisis — even taking every last penny of the one percent’s money won’t put a dent in our debt. The U.S. can pay off its debts, but it’s going to take significant to government spending.

Clearly, our elected officials need to make some tough decisions. But they had an opportunity to do just that with the debt ceiling.

Lawmakers once again failed to avoid the complacency that has made continued debt ceiling increases the status quo. Inaction by our elected leaders is at the root of the problem. Passing the buck works great for re-election campaigns, but only at the cost of a bright future for my peers, my children, and every future generation thereafter.

That’s why Millennials need to take a stand. At a bare minimum, we need to demand dollar for dollar cuts as a condition for raising the debt ceiling again in January. That’s right: for every new dollar our government wants to spend, they should also find another dollar to cut or save. Good thing there are no shortage of options.

Major entitlement spending consumed nearly half of the entire federal budget in 2012, and will grow to nearly two-thirds of budget in the next decade. Trustees for both Social Security and Medicare admitted that neither program will survive past 2033 without changes. Only 18% of young Americans actually believe they will receive Social Security benefits. Serious entitlement reform is a necessity, and simply raising the Social Security eligibility age by two years could save $148 billion. The program will collapse without serious reform; the only missing ingredient is political courage.

Fraud, redundancy, and wasteful spending across government agencies are costing taxpayers billions of dollars every year. In light of the recent shutdown, perhaps it’s not such a bad idea to figure out just now “non-essential” some of the federal government really is. Just reforming and reducing the massive federal workforce would save another $150 billion.

Additionally, the federal government owns vast amounts of land west of the Mississippi river — land that’s valued between $500 billion to $1 trillion according to the Congressional Research Service. Selling that land for private use would bring huge financial windfalls that could be used to responsibly pay down federal deficits, and provide untold economic growth. On top of that, the government spends more than $8 billion a year just maintaining 70,000 vacant buildings and properties.

The list of possible changes goes on. Now we just need for our elected officials to have the courage to make these hard choices and stop kicking the can down the road no matter what. It’s time for politicians in Washington to put the next generation before the next election.

Evan Feinberg is the President of Generation Opportunity.

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Americans warned bank ‘bail-ins’ coming

Experts say institutions will grab deposits without warning

28 Sep 2013
by Clark Kent

With the United States facing a $17 trillion debt and an acidic debate in Washington over raising that debt limit on top of a potential government shutdown, Congress could mimic recent European action to let banks initiate a “bail-in” to blunt future failures, experts say.

Previously the federal government has taken taxes from consumers, or borrowed the money, to hand out to troubled banks. This could be a little different, and could allow banks to reach directly into consumers’ bank accounts for their cash.

Authority to allow bank “bail-ins” would be in lieu of approving any future taxpayer bailouts of banks that would be in dire need of recapitalization in order to survive.

Some financial experts contend that banks already have the legal authority to confiscate depositors’ money without warning, and at their discretion.

Financial analyst Jim Sinclair warned that the U.S. banks most likely to be “bailed-in” by their depositors are those institutions that received government bail-out funds in 2008-2009.

Such a “bail-in” means all savings of individuals over the insured amount would be confiscated to offset such a failure.

“Bail-ins are coming to North America without any doubt, and will be remembered as the ‘Great Leveling,’ of the ‘great Flushing’ (of Lehman Brothers),” Sinclair said. “Not only can it happen here, but it will happen here.

“It stands on legal grounds by legal precedent both in the U.S., Canada and the U.K.”

Sinclair is chairman and chief executive officer of Tanzania Royalty Exploration Corp. and is the son of Bertram Seligman, whose family started Goldman Sachs, Solomon Brothers, Lehman Brothers, Bache Group and other major investment banking firms.

Some of the major banks which received federal bailout money included Bank of America, Citigroup and JPMorgan Chase.

“When major banks fail, they are going to bail them out by grabbing the money that is in your bank accounts,” according to financial expert Michael Snyder. “This is going to absolutely shatter faith in the banking system and it is actually going to make it far more likely that we will see major bank failures all over the Western world.”

Given the dire financial straits the U.S. finds itself in, these financial experts say that Congress could look at the example of the European Parliament, which recently started to consider action that would allow banks to confiscate depositors’ holdings above 100,000 euros. Generally, funds up to that level are insured.

Finance ministers of the 27-member European Union in June had approved forcing bondholders, shareholders and large depositors with more than 100,000 euros in their accounts to make the financial sacrifice before turning to the government for help with taxpayer funds.

Depositors with less than 100,000 euros would be protected. Considering protection of small depositors a top priority, the E.U. ministers took pride in saying that their action would shield them.

“The E.U. has made a big step towards putting in place the most comprehensive framework for dealing with bank crises in the world,” said Michel Barnier, E.U. commissioner for internal market and services.

The plan as approved outlines a hierarchy of rescuing struggling banks. The first will be bondholders, followed by shareholders and then large depositors.

Among large depositors, there is a hierarchy of whose money would be selected first, with small and medium-sized businesses being protected like small depositors.

“This agreement will effectively move us from ad hoc ‘bail-outs’ to structured and clearly defined ‘bail-ins,’” said Michael Noonan, Ireland’s finance minister.

The European Parliament is expected to finalize the plan by the end of the year.

The purpose of this “bail-in,” patterned after the Cyprus model, is to offset the need for continued taxpayer bailouts that have come under increasing criticism of the more economically well-off countries such as Germany.

Last March, Cyprus had agreed to tap large depositors at its two leading banks for some 10 billion euros in an effort to obtain another 10 billion European Union bailout.

While this action prevented the collapse of Cyprus’ two top banks, the Bank of Cyprus and Popular Bank of Cyprus, it greatly upset depositors with savings more than 100,000 euros.

WND recently revealed that the practice of “bail-ins” by Cyprus a year ago was beginning to spread to other nations as large depositors began to see their balances plunge literally overnight.

A “bail-in,” as opposed to a bailout that countries especially in Europe have been seeking from the International Monetary Fund and the European Union, is a recognition that such outside monetary injections won’t be forthcoming.

Sinclair said that the recent confiscation of customer deposits in Cyprus was not a “one-off, desperate idea of a few Eurozone ‘troika’ officials scrambling to salvage their balance sheets.”

“A joint paper by the U.S. federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and the Bank of England (BOE) dated December 10, 2012 shows, that these plans have been long in the making, that they originated with the G20 Financial Stability Board in Basel, Switzerland, and that the result will be to deliver clear title to the banks of depositor funds,” Sinclair said.

He pointed that while few depositors are aware, banks legally own the depositors’ funds as soon as they are put in the bank.

“Our money becomes the bank’s, and we become unsecured creditors holding IOUs or promises to pay,” Sinclair said.

“But until now, the bank has been obligated to pay the money back on demand in the form of cash,” he said. “Under the FDIC-BOE plan, our IOUs will be converted into ‘bank equity.’ The bank will get the money and we will get stock in the bank.”

“With any luck,” Sinclair said, “we may be able to sell the stock to someone else, but when and at what price? Most people keep a deposit account so they can have ready cash to pay the bills.”

Such plans already are being used, or under consideration, in New Zealand, Poland, Canada and several other countries.

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The debt bomb just got bigger

The amount of debt worldwide is more than all of the bank accounts in the world, and the current financial situation in Cyprus is the inevitable next phase: Confiscation.

All pretense is now gone that central or global bankers can ‘securitize’ growth by packaging and repackaging debt; by hypothicating and rehypothicating debt; by regulating and rergulating debt. Since the bond market rally began in the early 1980s (yes, it’s that old) each crisis has been met by central and global bankers – the IMF, EU and ECB, to name a few – and their Wall St. and City of London brethren with an increase in debt, and an extension of the debt’s maturity.

The result has been – as of 2007 – the biggest mountain of on-balance sheet and off-balance sheet debt in history: A staggering $220 trillion in debt in America’s $14-trillion economy alone (when you include all public, private and contingent liabilities of unfunded entitlement programs). Deals in the global debt derivatives market now stand in excess of $1 quadrillion, riding above a global GDP of approximately $60 trillion.

But starting in 2007, and then becoming spectacularly apparent in 2008 with the Lehman collapse, the ability of the world’s taxpayers to pay either the interest or principal on this debt has hit a brick wall. And for several years now, governments around the world have tried the same old tricks of ‘extend and pretend.’ Repackage and extend the maturity, and pray that tax receipts start picking up enough to pay some of the debt off. It didn’t work. The debt bomb just got bigger. Now in Cyprus we see the inevitable next phase: Confiscation.

To pay off the debts that were incurred to finance the biggest wealth grab in history, we see in Cyprus, as well as central and global banking institutions around the world, a trend to just reach in and grab people’s money from their ‘insured’ bank accounts. We should have figured out this was coming when JP Morgan (read: Jamie Dimon) reached in and illegally stepped ahead of customers at MF Global and grabbed over $1 billion, with the help of his crony pal Jon Corzine.

Have we learned our lesson yet? They have more debts to pay than there is money in all the bank accounts in the world. This means that chances are, you – whoever you are, and whatever country you live in – will have a sizable percent of your savings stolen by banksters.

Since the crisis hit (and for several years leading up to it) we’ve been recommending on ‘Keiser Report’ to put as much money as you can in gold and silver. Our advice then and now is: The only money you should keep in a bank is money you’re willing to lose.

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20 Signs That The U.S. Economy Is Heading For Big Trouble In The Months Ahead

Trouble In The Months AheadIs the U.S. economy about to experience a major downturn?  Unfortunately, there are a whole bunch of signs that economic activity in the United States is really slowing down right now.  Freight volumes and freight expenditures are way down, consumer confidence has declined sharply, major retail chains all over America are closing hundreds of stores, and the “sequester” threatens to give the American people their first significant opportunity to experience what “austerity” tastes like.  Gas prices are going up rapidly, corporate insiders are dumping massive amounts of stock and there are high profile corporate bankruptcies in the news almost every single day now.  In many ways, what we are going through right now feels very similar to 2008 before the crash happened.  Back then the warning signs of economic trouble were very obvious, but our politicians and the mainstream media insisted that everything was just fine, and the stock market was very much detached from reality.  When the stock market did finally catch up with reality, it happened very, very rapidly.  Sadly, most people do not appear to have learned any lessons from the crisis of 2008.  Americans continue to rack up staggering amounts of debt, and Wall Street is more reckless than ever.  As a society, we seem to have concluded that 2008 was just a temporary malfunction rather than an indication that our entire system was fundamentally flawed.  In the end, we will pay a great price for our overconfidence and our recklessness. (Read More….)

The Economic Collapse.

The Evidence Of A Coming Recession Is Overwhelming

by Comstock Partners

We first noticed the first signs that the economy was beginning to soften about three months ago.  Now the evidence of a slowdown has become so overwhelming that it is difficult to avoid the conclusion that we are headed for a recession.  We cite the following as evidence.

Retail sales (both total and non-auto) have dropped for three consecutive months.  This has happened only five times since 1967—-four times in 2008, and one now.  Vehicle sales have tapered off with May and June being the two weakest months of the year.  Consumer confidence for both the Conference Board index and the University of Michigan Survey are at their lowest levels of 2012.

On the labor front, June payroll numbers were weak once again and averaged only 75,000 in the second quarter. The latest weekly new claims for unemployment insurance jumped back up to 386,000 and the last two months have been well above the numbers seen earlier in the year.

The ISM manufacturing index for June fell 3.8 points to 49.7, its first sub-50 reading in the economic recovery.  The ISM non-manufacturing index for June dropped to its lowest level since January 2010.  Most recently the Philadelphia Fed Survey for July was negative (below zero) for the third consecutive month.

The small business confidence index declined in June to its lowest level since October and has now dropped in three of the last four months.  Plans for capital spending and new hiring have dropped sharply.

Despite all of the talk about a housing bottom, June existing home sales fell 5.4% to its lowest level since the fall of last year.  In addition mortgage applications for home purchases have been range-bound since October.

Core factory orders, while volatile on a month-to-month basis, have declined 2.6% since year-end, and the ISM numbers cited above indicate the weakness is likely to continue.

The Conference Board Index of leading indicators has declined for two of the last three months and is now up only 1.4% over a year earlier, the lowest since November of 2009, when it was climbing from recessionary numbers.  The ECRI Weekly Leading Index is indicating a recession is either here now or will begin in the next few months.

The breadth and depth of the slowdown are greater than the growth pauses experienced in mid-2010 and mid-2011, and indicate a strong likelihood of recession ahead.  In addition the foreign economies will be a drag as well.  A number of European nations are already in recession and others are on the cusp.  The debt, deficit and balance sheet problems of the EU’s southern tier are a long way from any solution, and will not remain out of the news for long.  China is coming down from a major real estate and credit boom, and is not likely to avoid a hard landing.  The Shanghai Composite is in a major downtrend, declining 28% since April 2011.  The view that China is immune because of their unique economic system reminds us of what people were saying about Japan in 1989.

The stock market is ignoring these fundamentals as it did in early 2000 and late 2007 in the belief that the Fed can pull another rabbit out its hat.  It couldn’t do it in 2000 or 2007 when it had plenty of weapons at its disposal.  Now there is little that the Fed can do, although it will try since it will not get any help, as Senator Schumer so aptly pointed out at Bernanke’s Senate testimony.  In sum, we believe that the stock market is in store for a huge disappointment.

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