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IMR vessel Seven Viking from ULSTEIN

The cutting edge Seven Viking vessel, designed for operations in the harshest environments is being unveiled and named at a ceremony in Stavanger, Norway, by Subsea 7, Eidesvik Offshore and Ulstein today, 30 January 2013.

The next generation Inspection, Maintenance and Repair (IMR) vessel, the Seven Viking, is co-owned by Subsea 7 and Eidesvik and has been constructed in partnership with Ulstein.

The ICE-C class vessel with a crew capacity of 90 and a top speed of 17 knots, will work for Statoil on a five year contract. It has been custom-built according to the operator’s specifications to carry out tasks including inspection, maintenance and repair of subsea installations in addition to scale treatment and RFO work scopes (Ready For Operations).

The vessel Godmother is to be Christine Sagen Helgø, the Mayor of Stavanger.

Subsea 7 Vice President for Norway Stuart Fitzgerald said: “The collective effort, and strong cooperation, between Ulstein, Eidesvik and Subsea 7, has resulted in the Seven Viking. The Seven Viking represents another class leading asset in the Subsea 7 fleet and captures Subsea 7’s unparalleled experience with IMR operations in harsh environments. The design and build of this state of the art vessel would not have been possible without the expertise and dedication of many people within both Subsea 7 and our project partners, and we take pride in their achievement. We look forward to many years of safe and efficient operations with Seven Viking for our Customer, Statoil.”

Jan Fredrik Meling, CEO Eidesvik Offshore said, “We in Eidesvik are very satisfied with the close and constructive cooperation with Subsea 7. The relationship between our companies has developed over many years and has enabled us, together with Ulstein, to launch this outstanding vessel.”

Gunvor Ulstein, Ulstein Group CEO said, “Ulstein is proud to deliver a vessel of unmatched technical and operational capacity in its sector, and I am confident that the Seven Viking will meet Statoil’s expectations.”

The Seven Viking incorporates the X-BOW® hull line design to reduce motion in transit and gives increased stability in the potentially high waves that characterise the North Sea. Despite this enviable stability usually associated with size, this version of the Ulstein SX148 design has been crafted to be compact in stature – measuring only 106.5 metres long and 24.5 metres wide. The dimensions will allow the Seven Viking to manoeuvre with ease in confined spaces, such as between platforms, accessing difficult to reach areas.

Thanks to a clever configuration whereby hull space is maximised and equipment is integrated within a large hangar area, the Seven Viking and its crew have the ability to carry all necessary maintenance equipment on board, ensuring that operational downtime is kept to a minimum.

Safety, efficiency and environmental considerations have been the prime focus for the three partners when developing the Seven Viking, which carries the Clean Design notation.

A customised module handling system (MHS) has been integrated in the ship’s hangar for the safe launch and retrieval of subsea modules weighing up to 70 tons through the moon pool.

To facilitate cooperation and communication, all operational personnel are gathered in one area adjacent to the hangar, with panoramic windows in the control room giving a full overview of this key activity area. The Seven Viking has been developed to meet the highest working environment standards, and is classified as a comfort class COMF-V (3) vessel. Minimal noise levels in the hangar have been achieved by opting for electric winches for the ROVs, the MHS and other utility equipment.

Notable environmental initiatives include diesel electric propulsion, which reduces atmospheric emissions, and the electrical winches which nullify the risk of emissions of hydraulic oil.

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Norway: Aker Solutions Secures Draupne FEED Contract

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Aker Solutions has won a contract from Det norske oljeselskap to conduct a front-end, engineering and design (FEED) study for the Draupne field on the Norwegian continental shelf.

The study will be carried out by Aker Solutions’ newly established engineering office in London, and delivered to the license partners in Q4 2012. The contract value is undisclosed.

“I am very pleased that Det norske has decided to follow on the pre-FEED contract with the award of the topsides FEED contract for the Draupne development. The Draupne pre-FEED was the first contract awarded to the re-established Aker Solutions engineering entity in London. The new award confirms the successful build-up of our London office,” says Valborg Lundegaard, executive vice president and head of engineering in Aker Solutions.

London

Aker Solutions in 2011 decided to re-enter the London engineering market. Only a few months after opening the new office in Chiswick Park, the company is once again becoming a significant player in the London market. The engineering office now counts 90 employees, and Aker Solutions expects to be around 200 people by the end of 2012.

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Draupne

The Draupne field is located to the west of Stavanger in the North Sea. The partners in the Draupne field have agreed with the partners in the Luno field on a coordinated development solution for the area. Draupne will be developed using a fixed platform with pre-processing, and the well stream will be transported from the Draupne platform to Luno for final processing and export to the markets.

Det norske is the operator and owner of 35 per cent of the Draupne license, together with Statoil (50 per cent) and Bayerngas Norge (15 per cent).

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Norway: GMC Yard to Modify AMC Connector

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The AMC Connector, the largest and most advanced cable- and pipe-laying vessel for deep ocean operations has arrived to Stavanger, Norway, to undergo modifications. The vessel will be docked at GMC Yard in Buøy outside Stavanger until March 11th 2012.

The 156-meter long multi-purpose vessel, AMC Connector, is an advanced ship with a high cargo capacity, a variety of special equipment and more than 190 kilometres of cable length. GMC Yard will modify the ballast tanks and building sponsoons under the hull. Work to be carried out includes adding a new auxiliary keel, installing a new stabilising tank and a new VLS tower on the vessel.

“The job is shared between GMC Yard, STX in Florø and the ship owner, Aker Marine Contractors. All already have workers on site for the stay in Buøy, says Operations Manager Kjell Olsen of GMC Yard. A total of 200 people are engaged in modifying the AMC Connector in this period.”

GMC Yard has docking capacity for vessels up to 280 meters, and the AMC Connector has no problem fitting into the large Dock 2 at Buøy. The vessel will be used for laying the power cable from land to the Goliath-field in the Barents Sea.

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Norway: Technip to Install Subsea Compression System on Asgard

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Technip has been awarded by Statoil a contract, valued above €150million (198.5 million U.S. dollars), for the major Åsgard Subsea Compression project located in the Norwegian Sea, 40 kilometers East of the Åsgard field, at a water depth of 340 meters. The contract covers the installation of the subsea compression system and its connection to the existing subsea infrastructure and the Åsgard platform.

The contract includes fabrication, installation and tie-in of pipeline spools including protection covers and installation of power cables and umbilicals.

It also comprises options for the following works:  engineering, fabrication and supply of a special handling system (SHS) for the installation and retrieval of the subsea compression system modules, initial installation of the subsea compression system modules.

Technip’s operating centers in Oslo and Stavanger, Norway will execute the contract. Offshore construction will take place in 2013 and 2014. The contract also includes options for the IMR(3) stand-by vessel until 2018.

The Åsgard field is situated in the Norwegian Sea, about 200 kilometres off mid-Norway and 50 kilometres south of Heidrun. Åsgard is one of the largest developments on the Norwegian continental shelf, embracing a total of 52 wells drilled through 16 seabed templates.

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