Blog Archives

Helix ESG’s T1200 Trencher Completes First North Sea Oil and Gas Project

Helix Energy Solutions Group’s new T1200 burial and trenching unit is quickly establishing a positive track record following the completion of an oil and gas project in the North Sea. The T1200 features a 1,200hp jet trenching spread, capable of burying product in water depths to 3,000m (10,000ft).

T1200 was deployed to bury a 14km long (8.7 mile), 10 inch export pipeline that included a 3 inch piggyback methanol line. The project specialization called for the line to be buried 2m (6.5ft) deep, with one meter of covering fill. The subsea trenching unit’s water jetting system trenched and simultaneously buried the pipeline under 1.4m (4.5ft) of sand in a continuous run that took just 48 hours.

The successful project is the T1200’s first oil and gas operation, and proves the versatility of the asset which has also been deployed to trench and bury high voltage undersea cables used to transport electricity from offshore wind farms to onshore power stations.

The T1200, operated by Helix ESG’s robotics subsidiary, Canyon Offshore, performed its first trenching job in early July 2012 at the Sheringham Shoal offshore wind farm trenching and burying an approximately 700m (2,300ft) long power cable between the wind turbines. Out of the 80 sections required in the field, the T1200 trenched and buried 37.

The T1200 was built in the UK by Forum Energy Technologies’ Perry Slingsby Systems ROV brand. The T1200’s design was based around the time proven T750 trencher( also owned and operated by Canyon Offshore) but has over 50 percent greater power and the capacity to trench larger diameter products (36 inches) to burial depths of 3m (10ft) depending on soil strength.

Subsea World News – Helix ESG’s T1200 Trencher Completes First North Sea Oil and Gas Project.

Helix ROV Support Vessel Ready for North Sea

Helix Energy Solutions Group’s newbuild charter ROV support vessel, Grand Canyon, recently completed sea trials and is ready to begin operations in the North Sea. During the sea trials the vessel’s propulsion system, dynamic positioning system and all her cranes were tested.

The vessel recently completed its outfitting in Norway after the initial hull construction was completed in Turkey. Grand Canyon is capable of launching five ROVs at once and will be operated by Helix ESG’s robotics subsidiary, Canyon Offshore.

The vessel will be the new home for another recently completed asset, the T1200 trenching unit. Used primarily to bury large diameter power cables leading from offshore windfarms, the T1200 is also capable of working on oil and gas projects to bury production pipelines.

The Grand Canyon was designed to provide a high capacity, stable working platform for lay, burial and general offshore construction work while still retaining a shallow draft, which is crucial when operating close to the coastline, and common in the renewable energy sector.Grand Canyon’s DP3 capability allows her to operate in any sector, providing offshore support in a wide variety of roles.

The vessel’s deck structure is specifically designed to accept trenching and flexible pipe or cable lay systems for safe and efficient mobilizations. A key focus throughout the design and build of Grand Canyon was to optimize the vessel and equipment design to facilitate efficient mobilizations.

Helix ROV Support Vessel Ready for North Sea | Offshore Energy Today.

UK: Helix Well Ops Charters Skandi Constructor from DOF Subsea

Aberdeen-based Helix Well Ops UK (Well Ops), a business unit of international offshore energy company Helix Energy Solutions Group (Helix ESG), is expanding its Europe and Africa well intervention fleet with an investment that will create 60 jobs.

A leading global provider of subsea well intervention, Well Ops will take control of the mono-hull well intervention vessel Skandi Constructor in spring 2013, after agreeing a three-year charter with DOF Subsea.

The move to strengthen Well Ops’ regional fleet, which currently includes the 132-metre (433ft) long Well Enhancer and the 114-metre (374ft) long MSV Seawell, will lead to the creation of approximately 50 jobs offshore and a further 10 onshore over the next nine months. At the moment the firm employs 70 staff in Aberdeen and a further 300 offshore.

Launched in 2009, Skandi Constructor is a 120-metre (393ft) long Ulstein SX121 DP3 mono-hull well intervention vessel that features the new X-bow design. The 8,500-tonne vessel accommodates up to 100 personnel and is capable of working in depths of up to 3,000 metres (9,842ft). It has a deck capacity of 1,470 square metres (15,822 sq ft) and features an 8m x 8m (27ft x 27ft) moon-pool, a 150-tonne crane, a multi-purpose tower with 140-tonne lift capability and two work class ROVs.

Well Ops will build and test, ready for use, a specially designed version of its 7⅜” subsea intervention lubricator (SIL) to enable subsea well interventions to be undertaken from Skandi Constructor. The SIL is a single trip well intervention system that provides well access, while managing containment when the well is ‘live’ and under pressure. The SIL is configured to undertake work through all types of subsea xmas trees. The vessel and SIL will allow Well Ops to provide its regional clients with a solution for deeper water wells and well interventions, which to date has been limited within the mono-hull vessel market.

Steve Nairn, Well Ops’ regional vice president of Europe and Africa, said: “Well Ops is extremely proud to announce the addition of a third vessel to our fleet and it underlines our commitment to providing well intervention services. Skandi Constructor strengthens our offering internationally and expands our well intervention service capability.”

The need for a third vessel in Well Ops’ fleet has been driven by demand from operators in the North Sea and in other oil and gas producing provinces. The firm recently secured contracts from a number of the North Sea’s major operators to provide light well intervention and associated subsea services from its existing vessels between 2013 and 2015.

Internationally, it has also received strong interest from operators, particularly in West Africa. This follows Well Enhancer’s deployment to the region earlier this year, where it completed what was believed to have been the region’s first well intervention project from a mono-hull vessel.

Mr Nairn added: “This is an exciting time for the company and the demand that we are witnessing is illustrative of the level of service and expertise that we can offer clients. As operators continually seek to make their operations more time and cost efficient, it is encouraging that more are turning to mono-hull vessels to conduct well intervention work.

“Our experience of providing an alternative to rig-based intervention systems has been built up over 25 years. MSV Seawell helped to pioneer light well intervention in the North Sea and we have built on this over recent years with Well Enhancer, which was the first mono-hull vessel capable of delivering coiled tubing intervention.”

Source

Helix Energy Announces 2Q Income Report (USA)

Helix Energy Solutions Group, Inc. reported net income of $44.6 million, or $0.42 per diluted share, for the second quarter of 2012 compared with net income of $41.3 million, or $0.39 per diluted share, for the same period in 2011, and net income of $65.7 million, or $0.62 per diluted share, in the first quarter of 2012.

The net income for the six months ended June 30, 2012 was $110.4 million, or $1.04 per diluted share, compared with net income of $67.2 million, or $0.63 per diluted share, for the six months ended June 30, 2011.

Second quarter 2012 results were impacted by a $14.6 million pre-tax charge ($0.09 per share after-tax) related to the decision to “cold stack” the Subsea Construction vessel, Intrepid, to reduce the book value to the vessel’s estimated fair value.

In addition, Helix Energy reached an agreement to acquire the Discoverer 534 drillship (D534). After closing and delivery to Singapore, the drillship will be converted into a well intervention vessel. The D534 is expected to enter service in the Gulf of Mexico in the first half of 2013.

Owen Kratz, President and Chief Executive Officer of Helix, stated, “Notwithstanding that both the Q4000 and the Seawell were out of service for a good portion of the second quarter due to longer than anticipated regulatory dry docks, Helix managed a fairly good second quarter, resulting in much stronger financial performance for the first half of 2012 compared to last year. Activity levels for both our Well Intervention and Robotics businesses remain strong as we continue to grow backlog. The addition of the D534 to our fleet will allow us to address the robust demand for well intervention services in the near term. In addition, we are pleased to report success on our Danny II exploratory well.”

Source

Gulf of Mexico: Helix Energy Makes New Discovery

Helix Energy Solutions Group announced an oil discovery at the Danny II exploration well at the Bushwood Field located in Garden Banks Block 506, approximately 145 miles offshore from Galveston, Texas. The Danny II exploration well encountered more than 70 feet of high quality net pay.

Johnny Edwards, President of Energy Resource Technology GOM (ERT), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Helix, stated, “Preliminary data from down-hole test tools confirmed oil in the Danny II well with over 9,500 psi of bottom-hole pressure. Additional testing to determine the composition of the reservoir fluids is on-going. We will provide an update on Danny II after completion.”

The Danny II exploration well was drilled to a total depth of approximately 14,750 feet, in water depths of approximately 2,800 feet. The well is currently being completed and most likely will be developed via a subsea tie back system to the 70% owned and operated East Cameron Block 381 platform located approximately 31 miles to the north in 370 feet of water. First production from Danny II is expected in the fourth quarter of 2012.

Helix holds a 50% working interest in the exploration well jointly with Deep Gulf Energy LP (Operator) and Deep Gulf Energy II, LLC (both First Reserve Corporation and Quintana Capital backed entities), who own the other 50% working interest.

Helix Energy Solutions Group, headquartered in Houston, Texas, is an international offshore energy company that provides key life of field services to the energy market as well as to its own oil and gas business unit.

Source

Helix Well Ops UK Completes Well Intervention in West Africa

image

Helix Well Ops UK (Well Ops), a business unit of international energy services company Helix Energy Solutions Group (Helix ESG), has successfully completed a three-month campaign for West Africa’s first well intervention work and subsea well operations conducted from a mono-hull intervention vessel.

Operating the 132-metre (433ft) long Well Enhancer, Well Ops performed a subsea tree change out, well suspensions, well maintenance and production enhancement on seven wells in water depths of up to 471m (1,545ft). This project represents the deepest operation conducted from Well Enhancer since it joined the fleet in 2009.

The Well Enhancer’s arrival in the waters west of Africa marked the emergence of mono-hull-based well intervention services in a region that is experiencing rapid development. Compared to rig-based methods, intervention programs delivered from mono-hull vessels provide numerous operational and cost benefits to operators.

Steve Nairn, Well Ops’ regional vice president of Europe and Africa, said: “Providing operators with alternatives to rig-based well intervention brings new cost and time efficiencies to West African oil and gas projects. Because Well Enhancer deploys more quickly than a rig, and is designed specifically for well intervention work, she reduces down time and helps operators return as quickly as possible to their business of oil and gas production.”

Well Enhancer

Well Enhancer provides remotely operated vehicle (ROV), saturation diving and riser-based and riserless well intervention services. It features a 150-tonne multipurpose tower which is capable of deploying slickline, e-line and coiled tubing tool strings for well interventions in water depths of up to 600m (1,968ft) for wireline and 200m (656ft) for coiled-tubing. The vessel’s other key features include a 7⅜” subsea intervention lubricator which is a conduit for both live well access and well containment, an 18-man saturation diving spread, work and observation class ROV’s, kill pumps, and a 100-tonne crane which is rated to operate to water depths of 600m (1,968ft).

A business unit of Helix Energy Solutions Group, Aberdeen-based Helix Well Ops UK provides a range of well operation and decommissioning services using specialist vessels and innovative equipment. Launched in 1987, MSV Seawell was a pioneer of the light well intervention market and completed its first wireline intervention project in 1988. In 2009, Well Ops expanded its fleet with the launch of Well Enhancer, a 132-metre (433ft) long well intervention and diving vessel. The company employs 70 staff in Aberdeen and a further 300 offshore.

Source

Helix Orders Semi-Sub Well Intervention Rig in Singapore

image

Houston-based subsea well intervention specialist, Helix Energy Solutions Group, Inc., has signed a contract with Sembcorp Marine’s subsidiary Jurong Shipyard in Singapore for the construction of its newbuild semisubmersible well intervention rig previously announced by Helix in February. The estimated value of the contract is US$385.5 million.

Owen Kratz, Helix’s Chairman and CEO, stated, “We are pleased to have selected a proven partner in Jurong Shipyard to leverage on our market and technological leadership in subsea well intervention. This new asset, engineered and designed based on the lessons learned from our successful Q4000 platform, is being constructed to meet an increasing market demand for specialized deepwater well intervention services worldwide. We look forward to the delivery of this new-generation advanced well intervention vessel and plan to expand this business segment even further.”

The semi-submersible well intervention rig will be built based on Bassoe Technology’s naval architectural design with Helix’s equipment layout. Featuring the latest technology, the rig is an efficient purpose-designed platform with capabilities to perform a wide variety of tasks, including conventional and extended top hold drilling, subsea construction, decommissioning well intervention, coiled tubing operations and twin ROV deployment.

Mr Don Lee, Senior General Manager, Jurong Shipyard’s Offshore Division said, “We are honoured that Helix has entrusted us with the construction of this highly specialised deepwater semi-submersible well intervention rig. This rig is Jurong Shipyard’s first specialised platform with well intervention and subsea capabilities and represents a significant advance for us in this growing new market segment. We would like to thank Helix for awarding us this contract, which is a testament to Jurong Shipyard’s rig construction capabilities and versatility in developing purpose-designed solutions for the offshore industry. We are committed to build on this new partnership with Helix and to meet their stringent standards of quality, safety and reliability

Source

Pemex Ready to Drill in GOM’s Deep Waters

image

by  Dow Jones Newswires
Laurence Iliff
Wednesday, February 29, 2012

MEXICO CITY – Mexico‘s state-owned oil company Petroleos Mexicanos, or Pemex, is ready to drill in the deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico near the maritime border with the U.S., its head of production said Tuesday.

Pemex has in place high-tech drilling platforms, safety systems and membership in a well-containment group as part of redundant measures to prevent and control an oil leak, Carlos Morales Gil said at a news conference.

Pemex has complied with the requirements of Mexico’s watchdog National Hydrocarbons Commission, or CNH, he added.

“Yes, we’re going to Perdido this year, in a few months,” Morales said, referring to the hydrocarbon formation already being drilled on the U.S. side. “And, yes, we are in compliance with all of the requirements.”

The CNH chief, Juan Carlos Zepeda, said recently that he didn’t think Pemex was prepared for the challenges of drilling deep-water wells–those at depths exceeding 6,000 feet. Zepeda had said that Pemex wasn’t in compliance with the CNH because the oil company hadn’t yet been accepted into a well-containment group.

Zepeda’s warnings followed the Deepwater Horizon blowout, which killed 11 workers in April 2010 and caused the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history. Pemex had its own blowout in the shallow waters of the Gulf in 1979 that spilled oil for months and fouled beaches in Texas.

Morales said Tuesday that Pemex has detailed seismic information of the Perdido area where it plans to drill, and that the oil monopoly has been training its own people and contracting international crews.

Furthermore, Pemex has received word that it is being accepted into the Helix Well Containment Group, he said, a U.S. consortium that inherited and improved some of the equipment used to cap the Deepwater Horizon spill.

Pemex is leasing three of the current generation of drilling platforms, according to Morales, with multiple safety systems. In the event of a blowout or leaking well, Pemex could drill a relief well relatively quickly because it has the three high-tech platforms in the Gulf and could move one or more.

On Monday, Pemex said it had a net loss of 23.8 billion pesos ($1.7 billion) in the fourth quarter as it paid more to the federal government in taxes and royalties than a year earlier, and had foreign exchange losses as a result of a weaker Mexican peso.

Pemex said sales in the final quarter of the year rose 22.5% from the fourth quarter of 2010 to MXN420.3 billion, thanks to higher world oil prices. The higher crude prices–$104.40 per barrel compared with $70.80 a year ago–were partially offset by lower export volume, which fell 10.5% to 1.339 million barrels a day, Pemex said in a filing with the local stock exchange.

Source

%d bloggers like this: