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Enhanced recovery through subsea compression at Gullfaks

Statoil and partner Petoro have agreed to apply subsea gas compression on the Gullfaks South field. This technological leap forward represents an important milestone in the efforts to improve recovery from this and other gas fields.

This technology adds 22 million barrels of oil equivalent to the production from the Gullfaks South Brent reservoir. The partners will invest some NOK three billion in the technology project scheduled to be completed in the autumn of 2015.

“Innovation and technology development are essential to improved oil and gas recovery and extended life for the fields on the Norwegian continental shelf. The development of subsea compression and processing is a central part of Statoil’s technology strategy for long-term production growth,” says Statoil’s executive vice president for Technology, Projects and Drilling, Margareth Øvrum.

The Gullfaks project is the second large subsea gas compression project planned by Statoil. In April this year the plan for development and operation for Åsgard subsea compression was approved by the Norwegian Parliament.

Both projects are scheduled to be compled in 2015. Furthermore Statoil is responsible for the technology qualification for Shell for a third not yet decided project, the Ormen Lange pilot. There are good synergies between the different projects.

Subsea gas compression is an important step on the road towards Statoil’s ambition of installing the elements for a ”subsea factory”. Subsea processing is key to getting access to resources in Artic areas and deepwater assets.

Read more:  Enhanced recovery through subsea compression at Gullfaks.

Statoil Introduces New “Cat J” Jackup Rig for Norwegian Continental Shelf + [VIDEO]

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OSLO (Dow Jones)– Norwegian oil and gas giant Statoil ASA (STO) Friday said it is introducing a new drilling rig concept for mature fields on the Norwegian continental shelf, in a move to increase the recovery rate from its wells and reduce costs.

The new rigs will cut production costs by around 20%, cut yard delivery costs by 10%, and increase oil recovery, the company said, essential at a time when production from its existing fields is falling by about 5% a year.

The partly state-owned company said it is preparing an invitation to tender for the new jack-up rigs, known as category J, able to operate at water depths from 70-150 meters and drill wells down to 10,000 meters. Statoil will ask for offers for a minimum of two rigs, at an estimated cost of $450 million-$500 million each.

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The company said the new rig type could be used on fields such as Gullfaks on the Norwegian continental shelf and Mariner on the U.K. shelf, and that the future Johan Sverdrup field could also be a candidate.

“Statoil has huge ambitions on the Norwegian shelf. We want to maintain current production until 2020,” said Statoil’s Chief Procurement Officer Jon Arnt Jacobsen, adding that the new rigs will help rejuvenate the current rig fleet.

“Today, more than 50 of the rigs on the Norwegian continental shelf are more than 20 years old, which means more maintenance and higher costs,” Jacobsen said.

The most important measure to extract more oil on the shelf is to drill more wells, the company said. The Cat J concept “will have real impact on improving oil recovery,” said Statoil’s Senior Vice President for Drilling and Wells, Oystein Arvid Haaland.

Statoil said the rigs should be owned by the licenses for each field, since the rigs are part of the long term development of the field. The company has discussed this with partners such as the state-owned petroleum company Petoro, said Jacobsen, adding that Petoro “supports this approach fully.”

Statoil is currently developing several large fields, including Gudrun, Dagny, Valemon, Luva, Skrugard and Avaldsnes /Aldous. It also plans increased oil recovery projects on several fields including Snorre, Statfjord, Troll, Oseberg, Gullfaks and Asgard, and fast-track developments on fields like Stjerne, Visund Sor and Hyme, among others.

Statoil is the world’s largest offshore operator and has 44 developed fields on the Norwegian continental shelf that produced about 1.4 million barrels a day in 2010.

The invitation to tender will be issued in July and the contracts will be awarded in the second half of 2012. The rigs will be delivered in the second half 2015.

At 1051 GMT, Statoil traded 0.6% higher at NOK161.40.

-By Kjetil Malkenes Hovland, Dow Jones Newswires

Source & [ VIDEO ]

Major Oil And Gas Finds In northern Europe

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Written by: EurActiv
January 10, 2012

Norway’s Statoil has made a second big oil discovery in the Barents Sea in less than a year and predicted more discoveries to come in the region.

The new oil find, called Havis, may hold between 200 million and 300 million barrels of oil equivalent (boe). The new find combined with the previous and nearby discovery, Skrugard, could provide between 400 million and 600 million boe, Statoil said yesterday (9 January).

“This is extremely positive,” said John Olaisen, an analyst at the Carnegie investment banking firm in Oslo. “This is an important strategic asset in a new oil region, so this is very good … One could expect more oil finds in the region after this.”

A Shell and ExxonMobil joint venture, Nam, has also announced what it says is the largest on-shore gas field discovery in the Netherlands since 1995, near Ee, in Friesland.

Production at the South Metslawier site, which is estimated to hold 4 billion cubic metres of reserves, is expected to begin in the summer, and last until 2015.

The Norwegian find in the Barents Sea, followed a carve-up of the territory in 2010 between Norway and Russia.

The Arctic region holds 25% of the world’s hydrocarbons, according to the US Geological Survey.

Norway is the world’s eighth-largest oil exporter and the second-largest for gas, which has seen declining oil output since 2001, following a string of offshore discoveries made over the past year.

Finding oil in the Norwegian part of the Barents Sea had until recently proven to be very difficult.

Over the past 30 years oil companies have drilled 92 exploration wells but only a handful have proven to be hits – Skrugard, Statoil’s Snoehvit gas field, Eni’s Goliat oilfield and Total’s Norvarg discovery.

Statoil now expects to strike more oil in the region around Havis.”We believe we now understand (the geology) and have cracked the code in this area,” the company’s chief executive Helge Lund said.

“We think we will be able to make additional finds in this licence in the future,” he said.

Production at Havis is expected to begin before the end of the decade.

The partners in the latest oil find are Statoil (50%), Italy’s Eni (30%) and Norwegian state-owned firm Petoro (20%).

Original article

Norway: Aldous/Avaldsnes One of Largest Discoveries Ever, Statoil Says

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Statoil ASA , together with partners Petoro AS, Det norske oljeselskap ASA and Lundin Norway AS, has confirmed significant additional volumes in its appraisal well in the Aldous Major South discovery (PL265) in the North Sea.

The results of appraisal well 16/2-10 have increased production license PL265 estimates to between 900 million and 1.5 billion barrels of recoverable oil equivalent.

This is a doubling of the previously announced PL265 volumes of between 400 and 800 million barrels of oil equivalent.

It has previously been confirmed that there is communication between Aldous in PL265 and Avaldsnes in PL501, and that this is one large oil discovery.

“Aldous/Avaldsnes is a giant, and one of the largest finds ever on the Norwegian continental shelf. Volume estimates have now increased further because the appraisal well confirms a continuous, very good and thick reservoir in Aldous Major South,” says Tim Dodson, executive vice president for Exploration in Statoil.

Final data show that the oil column in appraisal well 16/2-10 is approximately 60 metres. These data also confirm that the reservoir is of the same, excellent quality as in the Aldous Major South discovery well 16/2-8. This is the main reason for the substantial upward revision of PL265 volumes.

The Aldous/Avaldsnes discovery extends over a large area of ​​approximately 180 square kilometres, and there is considerable variation in both reservoir thickness and oil column height in the structure. Additional appraisal wells will be drilled in both licenses.

Statoil will await the results from these wells before providing updated and more accurate volume estimates for the combined discovery.

After completion of the appraisal well, the Transocean Leader drilling rig will move to the Troll field in the North Sea.

Aldous Major South is situated in production license PL265 in the North Sea, and appraisal well 16/2-10 was drilled 4.2 kilometres north of the 16/2-8 discovery well.

Statoil is the operator and has a 40% interest in PL265. The partners are Petoro AS (30%), Det norske oljeselskap ASA (20%) and Lundin Norway AS (10%). Well 16/2-10 is the seventh exploration well in PL265. The license was awarded in the North Sea Awards 2000.

Avaldsnes is located in production licence PL501. Lundin Norway AS is the operator with a 40% interest, while partners Statoil and Maersk have 40% and 20% interests, respectively.

Source

Norway: Det Norske Pens Important Jette Field Deals

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Det norske has signed three important contracts in preparing for the Jette development. The contractors are Cameron, Subsea7 and Aker Solutions​.

September 5th, 2011, Det norske oljeselskap ASA presented a plan for development and operation (PDO) of Jette to the Minister of Petroleum and Energy, Ola Borten Moe. The PDO was submitted on behalf of the partners in the Jette Group, which in addition to Det norske as operator, includes Petoro, Dana Petroleum and Bridge Energy.

Aldous Senior Vice President Projects, Bård Atle Hovd, says this is an important step towards developing Jette.

– We have now signed the third and final contract for the development phase. As soon as we receive the Ministry´s approval, we will embark on our first field development. We wish for a fast track development, enabling us to produce oil from Q1 2013

Jette is located in blocks 25/7 and 25/8, in the mid part of the North Sea. The field, which lies at a depth of 127 meters, will be produced with two horizontal wells, tied back to the Jotun floating production, storage and offloading vessel (FPSO).

Three suppliers

Det norske has signed supplier agreements with three contractors. Cameron has been selected to supply the subsea production system. They will, amongst other, fabricate the X-mas trees and protective structures.

Subsea 7​ will be responsible for engineering, procurement, fabrication and installation of a 6 kilometer flexible flowline and jumpers, installation of a 6 kilometer integrated services umbilical, X-mas trees and protective structures. They will also supply diver assisted tie-ins.

Aker Solutions is given the assignment to fabricate the 6 kilometer integrated services umbilical.

Original Article

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