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Gulf of Mexico: MWCC’s Subsea Equipment to Be Located in Mobile

Marine Well Containment Company (MWCC) announced today that Mobile, Ala. has been selected as the shorebase location to house the well containment company’s subsea umbilicals, risers and flowlines (SURF) equipment.

MWCC’s SURF equipment is an integral part of the company’s expanded containment system (ECS) that will enhance the company’s well containment capabilities in the deepwater U.S. Gulf of Mexico. MWCC will utilize the facilities and services of Technip USA and Core Industries to store, maintain and test the equipment.

Technip USA, a leader in subsea project management, engineering and construction for the energy industry, and Core Industries, a multi-faceted firm with vast industry knowledge and close proximity to the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, are well equipped to provide MWCC’s required services. MWCC is confident in its decision to partner with these companies as together they offer significant storage, maintenance, testing and deployment capabilities, as well as expertise, which are essential to achieving MWCC’s mission.

“Should our SURF equipment be needed to respond to a well control incident in the deepwater U.S. Gulf of Mexico, we know that we have the right support in place to respond safely and effectively,” said MWCC CEO, Marty Massey. “MWCC is committed to serving the U.S. Gulf and is proud to be a part of the Mobile community.”

The selection of Mobile for its SURF shorebase also allowed MWCC to tap into the skilled and industry-experienced workforce of Alabama to achieve its mission to be continuously ready to respond to a deepwater well control incident in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. The company will soon be transporting all of its SURF equipment to the Mobile shorebase where it will be properly stored and maintained at all times.

MWCC’s expanded system is scheduled for delivery starting later this year, and will further advance the company’s deepwater well containment technology and capabilities. The ECS will be able to cap and flow a well in up to 10,000 feet and will have the capacity to contain up to 100,000 barrels of liquid per day.

Subsea World News – MWCC’s Subsea Equipment to Be Located in Mobile, USA.

UAE: Drydocks World Wins Tanker-to-MVC Conversion Deal from AET

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Drydocks World has signed a contract with Singapore based AET, for two Tanker-to-Modular Capture Vessel (MCV) conversion projects. AET is converting these vessels as part of the Marine Well Containment Company’s (MWCC) well containment system.

MWCC is a not-for-profit, stand-alone organization with 10 member companies ExxonMobil, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, Shell, BP, Apache Anadarko, BHP Billiton, Statoil and Hess. The conversion will be implemented at the Drydocks World – Dubai facility.

The conversion shall allow the tankers to continue to operate normally as tanker in the US Gulf of Mexico, with capability to be deployed as MCV within shortest possible time. The first vessel is expected to arrive at the yard in December 2011 and the second vessel in February 2012. Each project will be completed within a period of nine months. Each vessel will handle about 100,000 barrels of liquid and about 200 million standard cubic feet of gas per day. The MCVs are capable of operating at depths of 10,000 feet.

The vessels will be equipped with new state-of-the-art containment system provided by Marine Well Containment Company. Conversion scope includes installation of 4 off power generators, 4 off retractable type azimuth thrusters one tunnel thruster, Dynamic Positioning, Pipe racks on deck and supports for Process Module, Flare tower, turret etc..

“We are extremely happy to sign this prestigious Contract with AET, a well-known global service provider, as part of our well-articulated strategy of building our presence in the oil, gas and energy industries. We already have an established reputation and strong expertise in carrying out sophisticated vessel conversion projects for world-leading companies. Our thrust on expanding our knowledge base and creating a technology-driven state-of-the-art facility has borne fruit and we are able to effectively serve the industry,” said Khamis Juma Buamim, Chairman of Drydocks World.

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Feds approve Murphy drilling project using Helix emergency equipment

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Cameron Wallace, left, and Eric Poller, a subsea engineer for Helix Well Ops, look at a new oil spill-containment system developed by Houston’s Helix Energy Solutions. (Michael Paulsen/Houston Chronicle)

by Jennifer A. Dlouhy

Federal regulators on Monday issued a permit to the first offshore drilling operation planning to rely on a Houston company’s cap-and-flow containment system in case of a disaster.

The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement gave the permit to Murphy Exploration & Production Co., allowing the firm to drill a sidetrack well at its Thunder Hawk field about 150 miles southeast of New Orleans.

Other companies have successfully submitted oil spill response plans that would rely on the capping stack developed by Helix Well Containment Group or a separate system devised by the Marine Well Containment Co. But Murphy is the first firm to win regulators’ sign off for an emergency response plan involving Helix’s full flowback system.

The cap-and-flow system caps the well and contains any additional flowing oil in case it is out of control. The entire system involves a capping stack installed on the well head and a flowback system designed to direct the crude to vessels floating overhead.

Although some wells require only the containment system, the cap-and-flow equipment is geared toward operations with higher pressure. Regulators say the cap-and-flow program can help maintain the integrity of an underwater well in cases where the capping stack alone might not do the trick.

The Helix cap-and-flow system is capable of sending 55,000 barrels of oil and 95 million cubic feet of gas per day to the floating ships.

Separately, Helix is asking the Obama administration for a license to provide its containment equipment in case of a spill from offshore drilling in Cuban waters. The Spanish company Repsol is set to begin drilling a deep-water exploratory well north of the island nation — just 50 miles from south Florida — in December or January.

Helix spokesman Cameron Wallace said the ultimate scope of services that would be offered is still under consideration “and no firm commitments have yet been made.”

The U.S. trade embargo against Cuba generally bars U.S. companies from exporting equipment and services to it, but American firms can get special approval from the Treasury Department.

“We believe that it is important to make proven solutions, similar to our Helix Fast Response System, available for any drilling project that could potentially impact the nation’s coastlines,” Wallace said. “Helix’s goal is to make some of these spill containment technologies available while fully complying with federal trade regulations.”

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