Blog Archives

USA: Broadwater Shelves LNG Plan

image

Broadwater Energy said that it has decided not to go forward with any aspect of its LNG project, the company said in a letter to U.S. FERC.

Broadwater also asked the Commission to vacate its previous authorization for the LNG project.

The company is a joint venture by TransCanada Corporation and Shell Oil, and it planned to build a floating storage and regasification unit (FSRU) attached to a yoke mooring system about 9 miles off Long Island and 10.5 miles off Connecticut, with a maximum regasification capacity of about 9 million mt of LNG per annum.

Source

USA: LI-NYC Wind Farm Collaborative Plans to Build Wind Farm off Rockaways

The Long IslandNew York City Offshore Wind Collaborative has filed an offshore land lease application with the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, taking a big step in bringing wind energy to New York City and Long Island.

The New York Power Authority, Long Island Power Authority and Con Edison have all come together to propose an offshore windmill farm in the Atlantic Ocean 15 miles off the Rockaway Peninsula.

With help from Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who is backing the initiative, the project has finally moved on to the approval process.

“We are massive supporters of this project,” said Dan Hendrick, communications director of the New York League of Conservative Voters. “This is great news for the region.”

Michael Clendenin of Con Edison said “It’s something people have been talking about for a while.”

It is hoped that the offshore windmill farm, though costly, can provide efficient energy for the entire region without further depleting the Earth’s ozone layer.

If the application passes and the project gets running, having a reliable source of energy could even obviate the need to bring in energy from upstate New York.

“New York has fantastic wind resources,” Hendrick said. “It is in the top 10 for wind resources in the country.”

The collaboration is taking advantage of the vast amounts of wind energy, but it comes with a steep price.

The expected cost of a 350-megawatt project, which would power roughly 112,000 homes, is $415 million, while an upgrade to 700 megawatts would cost an additional $406 million.

The offshore wind project, designed for 350 MW, with the possibility of expanding to 700 MW, would become the largest offshore wind farm in the country.

Not all are certain the project would be beneficial, however.

Recently elected Rep. Bob Turner (R-Queens and Brooklyn) said the “efficacy of wind farms might need more study.”

Turner said he wants to see further research on the wind farms off the coast of Europe before the United States puts a great deal of money into funding one here.

Studies have shown that the implementation of the wind farm would displace roughly 540,000 tons of carbon dioxide annually, equivalent to removing 120,000 cars from local roads, according to the collaborative’s website.

An earlier proposal for offshore wind farms in August 2007 off the coast of Jones Beach on Long Island was terminated due to concerns from local groups protesting the close vicinity of the windmills to the shore, coupled with rising technological costs at the time. But the agencies in the collaborative say this one would bring another benefit of greater concern today.

“The project is expected to boost the job market,” said Clendenin. “It is worthwhile and will create quite a few jobs.”

In fact, the collaborative estimates 2,300 to 4,700 job openings once the plan is enacted and the wind farm is set to be built.

As for the danger to birds, another concern with wind turbines, Hendrick said he does not see a problem, as the facility would be far enough off the coast that fly zones for migrating birds would not be disrupted. One major avian flyway goes right through Jamaica Bay.

“They tend to hug the shoreline,” Hendrick said.

If the lease is approved, the project could start as early as 2017, , Hendrick said, adding, “With everyone using cell phones and other forms of technology these days, we’re going to need more energy.”

by Fen Yi Chen (qchron)

Original Article

Deepwater Wind Submits Plans for Nation’s First Offshore Wind Farm

image

Deepwater Wind this week officially submitted its plan to develop a utility-scale offshore wind farm off the coasts of Rhode Island and Massachusetts, in response to the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE)’s Call for Information and Nominations for offshore wind energy projects in the federal ocean waters off southern New England.

Deepwater Wind’s project – the Deepwater Wind Energy Center (DWEC) – will be the first of the “second generation” of offshore wind farms in the United States. With a capacity of approximately 1,000 megawatts, DWEC will serve as a regional offshore wind energy center serving multiple states on the East Coast.

“The Deepwater Wind Energy Center is poised to be the first regional offshore wind energy center in the United States with a wind farm and a transmission system serving multiple markets,” said William M. Moore, Deepwater Wind CEO.

DWEC will be sited in the deep ocean waters of southern Rhode Island Sound, where it will be barely visible from the shore. Construction is planned to begin in 2014 or 2015, with the first wind turbines in operation by the end of 2016 or 2017.

With as many as 200 wind turbines, DWEC will be the largest offshore wind farm ever planned in the United States. Because of the economies of scale gained by building a large facility and because of the continuing maturity of the offshore wind industry, DWEC’s power price will also be lower than earlier offshore wind projects proposed in the U.S. DWEC will demonstrate that as the offshore wind industry continues to mature, its energy prices will become increasingly competitive with plants that burn fossil fuels – but without the environmental problems that plague fossil fuel plants.

“This ‘second generation’ of offshore wind farms will be larger and farther from shore, and will produce lower priced power, using more advanced technology than any of the offshore projects announced to date,” Moore said.

Deepwater Wind previously filed an unsolicited nomination to BOEMRE to lease the ocean site where it plans to locate DWEC. Since then, Deepwater Wind, after consultations with area fishing groups and other stakeholders, has refined the ocean lease blocks it has nominated in order to accommodate multiple different project designs. At this early stage of project development, Deepwater Wind believes that additional input from key stakeholders, such as commercial fishers, should be considered before final project siting is determined. Deepwater Wind’s lease block nomination creates this flexibility by including enough area for different project configurations.

Deepwater Wind is also developing a regional offshore transmission network, the New England-Long Island Interconnector (NELI), connecting DWEC to southern New England and eastern Long Island. NELI will allow the wind farm to send power to multiple states in the region. Deepwater Wind plans to market power from DWEC to several states, including Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New York, and Connecticut.

Most of the turbines will be located 20 – 25 miles from shore. No turbine will be located any closer than 13.8 miles from inhabited land, with only a few turbines located at that distance. At these distances, the wind farm will be barely visible from the shore and the project site can take advantage of the stronger winds found in the open ocean.

Deepwater Wind’s proposal sites DWEC in the “Area of Mutual Interest” between the states of Rhode Island and Massachusetts. As a result of a competitive bid process held by the State of Rhode Island in 2008, Deepwater Wind is the state’s preferred developer in this Area of Mutual Interest. The utility-scale project is also outlined in the Joint Development Agreement between Deepwater Wind and Rhode Island.

Deepwater Wind will base its manufacturing and construction operations at Quonset Point, in Rhode Island, where the company has over 100 acres under lease option. Deepwater Wind is also exploring port and other facilities in Massachusetts to compliment its Quonset base.

As a 1,000 MW regional offshore wind energy center, DWEC is a first-of-its-kind project in several ways and serves as a model for future Deepwater Wind projects. First, it is the largest renewable energy project ever proposed for the northeast United States.

“Energy independence for our nation is possible only by taking bold steps to wean ourselves off of our addiction to fossil fuels,” Moore said. “Second generation utility-scale wind farms like DWEC can significantly reduce our need to burn fossil fuels, improve local air quality, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions – problems that are especially acute in the densely-populated Northeast.”

Second, the projected pricing of the power from DWEC is expected to be lower than that proposed for any offshore wind farm ever planned in the United States. The wholesale price of power depends on the final size of the project, the final configuration of the transmission system, and the continued availability of federal tax incentives, however Deepwater Wind expects the pricing on a kilowatt-hour basis to be in the mid-teens (measured in cents). DWEC will demonstrate that offshore wind is becoming increasingly competitive with fossil fuel plants.

Third, at 1,000 MWs, DWEC may entice both domestic and foreign suppliers to seriously consider establishing significant parts of their fabrication, manufacturing, assembly, and support services in Rhode Island and Massachusetts. According to the Memorandum of Understanding between those two states, they will coordinate economic development to maximize job creation in the region. Before DWEC, the United States market was seen as underdeveloped and not large enough to justify a new manufacturing base for suppliers of components such as turbines and blades.

BOEMRE will review Deepwater Wind’s lease request in consultation with taskforces organized at the state level in Rhode Island and Massachusetts.

Original Article

%d bloggers like this: