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USA: CLNG Launches LNG Export Campaign

The Center for Liquefied Natural Gas (CLNG) announced the launch of a new initiative and dedicated website focused on America’s newfound opportunity to sell liquefied natural gas (LNG) to grow America’s economy, create jobs and improve America’s environment.

The CLNG exports website will provide the public with up-to-date information and expert analyses on the benefits of selling some of our abundant supply of natural gas outside the U.S.

A revolution in American energy has unlocked a vast supply of natural gas, more than enough to meet the needs of our country for generations to come,” said CLNG President Bill Cooper. “We can continue to harness this important resource for our domestic needs while also selling some to our trading partners. This will grow our economy, revitalize our manufacturing sector, and create tens of thousands of American jobs.

These benefits have been confirmed by experts and energy analysts. In fact, a report released earlier this year from the Brookings Institution concluded that selling natural gas would represent a “net benefit” to the American economy, and that U.S. policy should allow development to move forward.

It’s not a question of if this will benefit the United States; it’s a question of whether we will embrace a truly transformational opportunity,” Cooper added. “By recognizing the value of selling natural gas to our trading partners, the United States can ensure the continued utilization of our domestic natural gas supplies while simultaneously reaping the economic benefits of expanded trade. And to build the necessary equipment and infrastructure, billions of dollars will be invested in manufactured goods like steel, turbines and pipeline equipment that are all made here in the United States.

Each liquefaction plant represents a multi-billion dollar investment in the United States and can support as many as 9,000 American jobs in construction and facility operations. In addition, tens of thousands of jobs can be supported in a variety of sectors supporting increased natural gas production, including manufacturing, field services, pipeline construction, transportation, and many other related industries throughout the country.

Visit the website today to learn more about the benefits of selling LNG.

USA: CLNG Launches LNG Export Campaign LNG World News.

Obama Politics: Gas-Export Study Delay Puts U.S. Projects in Limbo for This Year

By Jim Snyder
Sep 18, 2012 2:14 PM CT

The Energy Department’s delay in releasing a report on liquefied natural-gas exports puts in limbo for this year as many as 12 applications including projects backed by Dominion Resources Inc. and Sempra Energy. (SRE)

The department commissioned the study last year to assess the economic impact of exports on domestic energy use after granting Cheniere Energy Inc. (LNG) permission to ship gas from Louisiana. It said future permits won’t be issued until the study is completed.

The first part of the study is complete, and a second portion was scheduled to come out in the first quarter. That date was pushed back to late in the U.S. summer, which ends Sept. 22. A posting on the department website now says it will be “complete by the end of the year.”

“It is really unfortunate, but I don’t think anything happens until we see the results of that report,” said Bill Cooper, president of the Center for Liquefied Natural Gas, which advocates for gas shipments. The Washington-based group includes LNG producers, shippers and terminal operators.

“None of the applicants, I’m certain, want to see a delay in the regulatory process,” Cooper said in an interview.

The study was started after lawmakers led by Representative Edward Markey, a Massachusetts Democrat, and Senator Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat, said overseas sales might increase domestic energy prices.

The delay probably will push release of the Energy Department’s report until after the election in November.

‘Complicated Analysis’

“This is a complicated economic analysis assessing a dynamic market,” Jen Stutsman, an Energy Department spokeswoman, said in an e-mail. “We take our responsibility to issue these determinations seriously and want to make sure the necessary time is taken to get it right.”

Investors including Sempra Energy in partnership with Mitsubishi Corp. and Mitsui & Co. Ltd., Freeport LNG with Macquarie Group Ltd., and Dominion Resources, have applied for approvals from the Energy Department.

U.S. permits are required to sell gas to countries that aren’t free-trade partners with the U.S., a group that includes Japan and Spain.

As natural-gas prices soared in the last decade, energy companies sought permission to build import terminals. Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, for natural gas has opened access to reserves that previously couldn’t be produced economically, driving prices to a decade low and letting companies shift gears and seek overseas buyers for the fuel.

In fracking, oil and gas companies shoot a mixture of water, sand and chemicals underground to crack shale rock formations and free fossil fuels trapped inside.

To contact the reporter on this story: Jim Snyder in Washington at jsnyder24@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Jon Morgan at jmorgan97@bloomberg.net

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Feds approve Cheniere’s plan to export natural gas

imageApril 16, 2012 at 6:01 pm
by Jennifer A. Dlouhy

Houston-based Cheniere Energy on Monday cleared the final major hurdle to exporting natural gas when federal regulators approved the firm’s plan to build a plant in southwest Louisiana for liquefying the fuel.

The decision by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission puts Cheniere on track to convert its existing Sabine Pass terminal for receiving liquefied natural gas by 2015 — a timeline that would make it the first LNG export facility in the lower 48 states. One operates now in Alaska.

The company aims to export up to 3.5 million tons per year from the facility in Lake Charles, La. Cheniere plans to build the liquefaction plant in two stages, adding 191 acres to the existing terminal’s space. The facility would still be able to receive liquefied natural gas from tankers.

“Obtaining approval from the FERC is one more milestone for our liquefaction project,” said Cheniere CEO Charif Souki. “We will now finalize the financing arrangements in order to commence construction.”

About half a dozen other companies, including Texas-based Freeport LNG, also are pursuing exports to take advantage of the glut of natural gas produced in the U.S. using horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques that free hydrocarbons from dense shale rock formations.

Exports would allow natural gas producers and processors to capitalize on higher prices globally compared to the United States. In the U.S. Monday, natural gas futures settled just over $2 per million British thermal units after hitting 10-year lows last week.

In Cheniere’s case, the strategy is a bid to put its receiving terminal to work. The Sabine Pass terminal went online in 2009, just as U.S. natural gas production surged and killed the need for LNG imports.

When natural gas is cooled to 256 degrees below zero it becomes a liquid that tanker ships can transport. At its destination it is converted back into gas. Cheniere’s Sabine Pass terminal is outfitted with regassification and storage equipment now.

In approving Cheniere’s liquefaction plant plans, FERC also could also give a boost to U.S. producers with big natural gas portfolios.

But a rise in natural gas prices would increase consumers’ monthly bills and also would be bad news for chemical manufacturers that use natural gas as a building block to create other products.

Congressional Democrats have proposed legislation that would ban new LNG exports. Rep. Ed Markey, D-Mass., who is pushing a ban, said the expert terminals would mean sending U.S. natural gas to China and Europe 00 and “exporting our manufacturing jobs abroad along with the fuel.”

“America should exploit her competitive advantage with lower natural gas prices to create jobs in the United States, not export natural gas to create more profits for oil and gas companies,” Markey said.

And environmentalists have asked top Obama administration officials to require a broader review of the consequences of the surge in natural gas drilling that probably would result from selling the fuel overseas.

Critics fear hydraulic fracturing can contaminate water supplies and cause localized earthquakes. Sierra Club Executive Director Michael Brune said in a statement Monday that exports would increase production and hydraulic fracturing, “making a dirty fuel more dangerous and putting more American families in at risk.”

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Macquarie Vies To Sell U.S. LNG To India

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For all the hubbub over the competitive threat posed by U.S. gas exports to Australia’s rapidly growing liquefied natural gas sector, Macquarie clearly smells an opportunity.

Indian energy company GAIL expects to sign a deal within a month with Macquarie Energy to buy 2 million tons of liquefied natural gas annually for 20 years from the Freeport LNG project in the U.S.

“We are in advanced discussions with Macquarie. I think we will be able to sign the deal in a month’s time,” a senior executive with India’s largest gas distributor told Deal Journal Australia’s colleague Rakesh Sharma in New Delhi.

Macquarie Group’s North American energy marketing and trading arm, Macquarie Energy, and Freeport LNG Expansion LP, are jointly developing and marketing liquefaction capacity at the LNG terminal in Freeport, Texas.

Macquarie’s corporate communications team weren’t immediately available for comment on the talks with GAIL.

The U.S. shale-oil and natural-gas boom has transformed the gas market, made the country a net exporter, depressed gas prices and has prompted several players to set up LNG export operations with an eye on rapidly-expanding Asian markets.

GAIL in December agreed to buy 3.5 million tons per year of LNG for over 20 years from Sabine Pass Liquefaction LLC, a unit of the U.S.-based Cheniere Energy Partners LP, at a free-on-board price indexed to the Henry Hub price, the main international benchmark for natural gas prices in North America.

The executive said the deal with Macquarie will also be linked to Henry Hub, instead of crude-oil prices. This will help GAIL get LNG at competitive rates as its end-customers in India are price sensitive, he added.

GAIL projects its gas import needs to grow seven times to 187 million standard cubic meters a day by 2015 from end-2010. The share of imported gas in its total gas use is set to rise to around 48% from 15% during the same time period, IHS Global Insight said in a note last month.

The gas pipeline utility is pushing hard to line up supplies. In September, it took a 20% stake in Houston-based Carrizo Oil & Gas Inc.’s Eagle Shale Ford acreage and in November set up a unit in Singapore for LNG trading.

“The deal [with Macquarie] is a part of company strategy to assure long-term supplies,” Bhavesh Chauhan, an analyst with Mumbai-based Angel Broking, said.

Another analyst, who didn’t wish to be named, said the deal will be a big positive as a fall in domestic Indian gas production has reduced GAIL’s transmission volumes and its pipeline network is facing low utilization.

Last month, the head of global gas at UK-based energy consultancy Wood Mackenzie said the U.S. could emerge as a major competitor to Australia’s burgeoning gas-export market, challenging the viability or expansion plans of close to a dozen Australian liquefied natural gas projects.

“We’re of the view that North America will have 20 million tons of LNG capacity maybe as early as 2018,” Woodmac’s Noel Tomnay said. “Consequently, that will remove potential market share for Australian LNG projects.”

Investment totaling over A$175 billion has been earmarked for new Australian LNG terminals focused mainly on Asia since 2007, which could catapult Australia ahead of Qatar as the world’s largest LNG exporter within a decade. Friday, Japan’s Inpex and France’s Total formally approved construction of their $34 billion Ichthys gas-export facility in the Northern Territory.

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