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Gulf of Mexico: InterMoor Completes Heave-Compensation Job in U.S. GoM

InterMoor, an Acteon company, has successfully completed a contract with Cross Group, Inc. that included the provision of heave-compensation services for the installation of a Cross 7.0 workover riser package (WRP).

An InterMoor compensated anchor-handler subsea installation method (CASIM) unit played a key role in deploying and recovering the WRP.

“The CASIM system enabled us to provide effective heave compensation and to recover the delicate WRP on a vessel without an active heave-compensated crane or stern roller,” said InterMoor vice president of business development David Cobb. “That was the only way to achieve the WRP installation from this vessel. The success of this project underlines the value of the CASIM system as a cost- and time-effective solution, and explains why more and more subsea contractors and operators are choosing it to facilitate the installation of workover packages.”

Each standard CASIM unit has a maximum stroke of 3 meters and can accommodate loads up to 50 tons.

The heave compensation operation was in water depths of about 140 meters and used Cal Dive’s Uncle John DP saturation diving vessel to install the 29-ton WRP. The project took place at East Cameron well 378#3, offshore Louisiana, USA. The Cross Group is conducting a plugging and abandonment (P&A) program in the field for EPL Oil & Gas, Inc.

This project demonstrates how InterMoor can provide cost-effective solutions for the installation of subsea workover equipment using vessels of opportunity. Operators trust InterMoor to be part of their P&A campaigns and to help them meet BOEMRE NTL No. 2010-G05 requirements for timely decommissioning of idle infrastructure on active leases.

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InterMoor Completes IRIS Installation and Recovery for Apache in Gulf of Mexico, USA

InterMoor, an Acteon company, has completed an installation and recovery project for Apache Deepwater LLC (Apache) in Mississippi Canyon Block 148, Well 5 in the Gulf of Mexico.

The work scope included the overboard, wet transfer, deployment and recovery of a 30-ton interchangeable riserless intervention system (IRIS) owned by Blue Ocean Technologies. InterMoor undertook the work in water approximately 168 meters deep from Cal Dive’s Uncle John semisubmersible vessel.

InterMoor delivered the project using its compensated anchor handler subsea installation system (CASIM) which reduces heave motions relative to vessel motions. CASIM units are pre-charged at the surface to deliver the needed heave compensation for the load at depth. InterMoor’s proprietary CASIM method requires less deck space and demands fewer deck operations than the traditional buoy-based heave-compensated landing system. The company also provided the associated rigging equipment and a technician to help facilitate the subsea compensation.

“Apache selected InterMoor for this project on the basis of our service record, the fact that we had the necessary equipment available and because of our experience in subsea operations of this kind,” said InterMoor project manager Jacob Heikes. “Although we have used CASIM to deploy and recover many types of subsea equipment, this is the first time that we have used CASIM for IRIS deployment and recovery, and the project’s success shows that this proven installation method is suitable for a wide range of subsea equipment.”

Subsea World News – InterMoor Completes IRIS Installation and Recovery for Apache in Gulf of Mexico, USA.

USA: InterMoor Places Mooring Chain Order

InterMoor, an Acteon company, has placed the largest chain order by length of any provider in recent years with one of the world’s largest chain manufacturers.

More than 32 km of 84- and 76-mm chain is on order for delivery at the end of the year, which will be added to already the largest holdings of mooring equipment in the world. The chain, available to customers worldwide, will be used to renew and supplement InterMoor’s vast inventory of mooring equipment and will be used primarily to support the company’s preset mooring programs or add on to the mooring components of drilling rigs.

In addition to the chain purchase, orders for buoyancy and ancillary equipment have also been placed to support the growing needs of InterMoor’s regional locations.

Tom Fulton, InterMoor president, said “This purchase will strengthen InterMoor’s position as the leading global mooring, foundations and subsea services company and will offer our customers quicker access to vital equipment, thereby reducing downtime and costs,” said Tom Fulton, InterMoor president. “This is a very large investment that shows commitment to the developed regions and will help our customers start exploring in areas where constraints in the supply of chain might have previously been a challenge. Renting equipment speeds up the mobilization of drilling rigs, reduces capital investment requirements and enables our clients to concentrate on their core work.”

USA: InterMoor Places Mooring Chain Order | Offshore Energy Today.

Brazil: InterMoor Completes Conductors for Papa Terra Project

InterMoor, an Acteon company, has completed installation of the drilling and production conductors for the Papa Terra project, announced Global President Tom Fulton. Petrobras serves as the operator of the Papa Terra concession with a 62.5 percent interest; Chevron holds the remaining 37.5 percent interest.

InterMoor was responsible for the design, procurement, fabrication and installation of 15 conductors for the project. Fabricated at InterMoor’s 24-acre, Morgan City, La., facility, the conductors are 36 inches (91 centimeters) in diameter and 187 feet (57 meters) long.

InterMoor chartered the Skandi Skolten, DOF Subsea’s Construction Anchor Handling Vessel, and the installation barge with a customized conductor launch system. For conductor driving, InterMoor used MENCK’s MHU-270T DWS which included a deepwater hydraulic hammer capable of providing a driving energy of 270 kilojoules at a water depth of 3,281 feet (1000 meters) combined with MENCK’s girdle-type electro-hydraulic power pack and umbilical support system. Generating hydraulic power at depth, rather than at the surface, means no hydraulic hose, therefore minimalizing environmental impact and energy loss.

The conductors were installed in water depths of 3,937 feet (1,200 meters) in the southern Campos Basin off the coast of Brazil. The installation took place in April 2012. InterMoor’s conductor services optimize conductor design to meet project-specific load and fatigue requirements, and the unique patented installation method allows installation without the need of a construction vessel. A standard Anchor Handling Vessel is sufficient, leading to a more economical installation off the rig’s critical path.

“We are proud to have successfully completed this important installation for Petrobras and to be part of the first offshore tension-leg, wellhead platform in Brazil,” said Fulton. “Our collaboration with sister company MENCK proved to be an effective partnership, and InterMoor remains the only company worldwide to offer a full conductor installation service in deep water.”

“InterMoor has been developing its strength in the Brazil market through our office in Rio de Janeiro, and this project completion confirms the breadth of our capabilities in the region,” added John Riggs, Managing Director for InterMoor do Brasil.

Subsea World News – InterMoor Completes Conductors for Papa Terra Project (Brazil).

USA: MOSS Reviews Permanent Platform Wire Replacement

InterMoor successfully replaced (8) spiral-strand platform wires on a permanent production facility in May 2011 without requiring a platform shutdown or loss of production. The operation was completed using a single Construction Anchor-Handling Vessel (CAHV) at a significant cost savings from the traditional method involving a derrick barge.

Each mooring line consisted of unjacketed spiral-strand wire at the fairlead, two sections of jacketed spiral strand in the water column and studless chain at the seafloor. Syntactic-foam submersible buoys had been installed at each spiral-strand wire connection, so each mooring line had two buoys.

Only the platform wires were to be replaced, and the remaining mooring components including the buoys were to be reused. Protecting the existing components from damage during recovery and reinstallation posed several unique challenges. One of the main operational challenges was to design a way to bring the upper buoy and platform wire out of the water and secure them on deck so that the old platform wire could be disconnected. To accomplish this, InterMoor designed and installed a custom hang-off porch at the CAHV’s stern. The porch used a combination of pneumatic and hydraulic cylinders to manipulate and align the entire porch as each buoy connection was recovered and deployed. The porch also had separate stoppers for the socket connections and a removable cradle for the buoy. Another operational challenge was the unknown condition of the buoys themselves, particularly since they were to be reused on the replacement wires. There was no industry experience at the time in retrieving foam buoys that had remained submerged at depth for over a decade. This paper will explore these challenges and others in more detail as well as the steps that were taken to successfully overcome them.

Subsea World News – USA: MOSS Reviews Permanent Platform Wire Replacement.

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