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Helix ESG’s T1200 Trencher Completes First North Sea Oil and Gas Project

Helix Energy Solutions Group’s new T1200 burial and trenching unit is quickly establishing a positive track record following the completion of an oil and gas project in the North Sea. The T1200 features a 1,200hp jet trenching spread, capable of burying product in water depths to 3,000m (10,000ft).

T1200 was deployed to bury a 14km long (8.7 mile), 10 inch export pipeline that included a 3 inch piggyback methanol line. The project specialization called for the line to be buried 2m (6.5ft) deep, with one meter of covering fill. The subsea trenching unit’s water jetting system trenched and simultaneously buried the pipeline under 1.4m (4.5ft) of sand in a continuous run that took just 48 hours.

The successful project is the T1200’s first oil and gas operation, and proves the versatility of the asset which has also been deployed to trench and bury high voltage undersea cables used to transport electricity from offshore wind farms to onshore power stations.

The T1200, operated by Helix ESG’s robotics subsidiary, Canyon Offshore, performed its first trenching job in early July 2012 at the Sheringham Shoal offshore wind farm trenching and burying an approximately 700m (2,300ft) long power cable between the wind turbines. Out of the 80 sections required in the field, the T1200 trenched and buried 37.

The T1200 was built in the UK by Forum Energy Technologies’ Perry Slingsby Systems ROV brand. The T1200’s design was based around the time proven T750 trencher( also owned and operated by Canyon Offshore) but has over 50 percent greater power and the capacity to trench larger diameter products (36 inches) to burial depths of 3m (10ft) depending on soil strength.

Subsea World News – Helix ESG’s T1200 Trencher Completes First North Sea Oil and Gas Project.

PHOTOS: Express installing subsea manifolds « Helix Currents

Photos courtesy of Helix Subsea Construction Field Engineers Robert Bailey & Matt Gonzales.

Taken on board Helix ESG’s pipelay vessel, Express, these photos show two Pipeline End Terminal manifolds (PLETS) as they are hoisted off an adjacent supply boat and lowered down to the seabed.

A PLET is used on one, or both ends of pipelines to provide connection point from the pipeline to existing subsea structures in place.  The existing structure may be a subsea tree, another PLET or a manifold and are connected by a jumper.  The PLETs and other subsea structures have upward looking connectors while the jumpers have downward looking connectors.  This configuration allows the jumpers to be installed using Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs).

Helix Subsea Construction, a business unit of Helix ESG, is installing this PLET as part of the overall scope of Subsea Umbilical, Riser and Flowline (SURF) work for Noble Energy at the Noa Field, offshore Israel. The field is in approximately 2,556ft of water (779m) and is being developed for natural gas.

Source: PHOTOS: Express installing subsea manifolds « Helix Currents.

Noble Energy Linking Noa and Pinnacles to Mari B Platform

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Noble Energy and Delek Group have started linking Noa and Pinnacles offshore natural gas fields to the Mari B production platform, according to the Israel’s financial newspaper Globes.

Helix ESG’s reeled pipelay vessel, Express, which in April arrived at the port city of Haifa, Israel has started SURF (Subsea Umbilicals, Risers and Flowlines) work.

According to the data on Noble Energy’s website, Noa will, once developed, provide 100 million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d) of production by September 2012.

Development of the Noa field is geared to allow for additional supplies of natural gas to the Israeli market, until the start of natural gas supplies from the Tamar project.

Source

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