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Happy Dragon Ships 8 Manifolds to Goliat Field Offshore Norway

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Aker Solutions has successfully completed the manufacturing and subsequent load-out of eight subsea manifolds and six riser bases for Eni Norge’s Goliat project in the Barents Sea.

On Tuesday 27 March the load-out commenced. This weekend, the heavy lift vessel Happy Dragon will sail away with her giant load.

”This is probably the largest single subsea delivery we have made from Egersund. I’m proud of my colleagues, and satisfied on behalf of our customer Eni Norge AS, that we are delivering this on schedule and on budget,” says Svein Oskar Nuland, head of Aker Solutions’ yard in Egersund, Norway.

“Our project team at Fornebu and here in Egersund has worked tirelessly to complete this important milestone”.

The delivery of the subsea manifolds and riser bases is the yard’s second hardware load-out for the Goliat subsea project. The first, consisting of eight subsea templates, was also delivered on schedule when it sailed out of Egersund at the end of March last year.

Aker Solutions’ Goliat contract, signed in September 2009, comprises of engineering, procurement and construction of a complete subsea production system. Subsea hardware deliveries include eight overtrawlable four-slot subsea templates with manifolds, wellheads system, 24 subsea trees, subsea and topside controls systems, 20 kilometres of steel tube umbilicals, work-over equipment and a tie-in and connection system.

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Introducing the Constructor-Class from GustoMSC

By On March 13, 2012

Oil and gas will remain the backbone of the world’s energy supplies for a long time to come, and the offshore sector continues to expand in every direction, in particular, toward deeper water and harsher environments.

According to Douglas Westwood’s ”World Deepwater Market Report 2011-2015,” the capital expenditure (CAPEX) index forecasts annual growth rates for the deepwater sector of over 20%.  All aspects of the deepwater market are contributing to this figure, with a share of about 40% for pipelines, subsea production and processing, and other SURF (Subsea, Umbilical, Riser, Flowline) activities.

About 6 months ago, GustoMSC unveiled the new Constructor class of vessels, which were specifically designed to accommodate present and future requirements of the offshore oil & gas construction and SURF market for large offshore vessels.

SURF vessels have to be able to work in deep water for prolonged periods, have short mobilization times, and also have the potential for future upgrades to operate in specific areas or conditions. The increasing water depth is for instance driving the requirements for crane capacities. The remoteness of operating areas requires vessels to be more self-supporting, have a larger payload and be increasingly efficient. Harsher conditions are one driver for improved power generation. The need for short mobilization times is driving the design of the hull for higher speeds.  All future SURF vessels will need to optimally combine these features if they are to be acceptably cost-effective.

Besides the operational requirements, safeguarding and improving health, safety, and the working environment are also essential elements of developmental work. In the offshore sector, comfort is not something to be taken lightly. Offshore vessels often have a large complement of specialists with complicated, intensive tasks to perform. They need a sound reliable platform on which to do their work.  Fatigue is always a concern. Noise and vibration, and a lack of amusement over a prolonged period are all elements contributing to fatigue while the increasingly demanding projects require the crew to be superbly fit and show plenty of stamina. And last but not least, in the hard competition for qualified personnel, owners need to be able to offer an attractive working environment for their crews.  – GustoMSC InSide

The vessels can be provided with various mission equipment systems, such as pipelay systems (S- or J-lay), reel-lay systems, flex-lay systems or be equipped as deepwater installation and cable lay. Mission equipment can be installed to operate either through a moonpool or over the stern or over the side.

We asked GustoMSC’s Sales Manager, Mattijs Faber, what the most unique feature of these vessels were.  His response:

The vessels size and capabilities are most unique and unmatched in the market: 2800sqm of aft deck, 10,000 metric ton payload to play with, capability to install a 600 metric ton subsea crane, as well as sea keeping and dynamic positioning capability in harsh conditions.

He also comments saying that an even larger version, the SURF XL, is currently being developed for operators working in the most demanding regions around the world.  This new vessel will combine reel and J-lay capabilities and have a 1,000 ton heave compensated subsea installation crane and a deep water lowering system.

As an option, all of these vessels can be designed with DNVIce Class notation. Their main dimensions are 155 x 30 x 13m (Loa x B x D), (DLV3000  version: 170 x 42 x 12m).

Constructor – DLV 3000

Application: Heavy Lift 

The largest vessel in the Constructor class is a real workhorse, designed to serve a wide range of roles in the construction market. The deepwater S-lay system with removable stinger and versatile 3,000t main crane with heave compensation makes the vessel suitable for deepwater installation roles. The optional mooring system allows the vessel to perform shallow water operations in close vicinity to platforms. The offset crane position provides the vessel with an unmatched effective outreach over the side and over the stern. The A-deck arrangement provides a flush and unobstructed working deck with sufficient space for modules, jackets, piles and all kinds of (subsea) equipment.  An active ballast system will be installed to reduce heeling angles during lifting operations.

Additionally the vessel will be capable of pipelaying by means of a fully covered single joint pipelay factory (Double joint in a lengthened version).

The Constructor – Flex Lay 550

Application: Subsea Umbilicals, Risers, and Flowlines (SURF) 

The vessel takes a vast amount of products in its below deck carousels and has been provided with a 550 MT Vertical Lay System positioned over a moon pool in the mid ships. Ample crane capacity will be provided in order to service subsea operations as well as the deck and moon pool area.

Constructor MPOSV

Application: SURF

The vessel can be provided with various mission equipment systems, such as pipelay systems (S- or J-lay), reel-lay systems, flex-lay systems or be equipped for various other missions, such as deepwater installation and cable lay. Mission equipment can be installed to operate either through a moonpool (option) or over the stern. Ample crane capacity can be provided in order to service subsea operations as well as the deck and moon pool area.

Constructor S-Lay Vessel

Application: SURF

The vessel has been provided with a Single joint S-lay pipelay system located under deck, with a fixed (removable) stinger. The vessel provides a stable platform for lifting operations and high crane capacity can be provided in order to service subsea installation operations as well as other construction activities.

GustoMSC HV Power Cable Lay Vessel

Application: For Linking Onshore and Offshore Power Grids

The vessel takes a vast amount of products in its carousels. An A-frame can be provided for launching and retrieving ploughs and trenchers.

In order to provide the necessary flexibility for crossover work into the offshore construction market the vessel allows for ample crane capacity as well as a large open deck area.

Source

Introducing the Constructor-Class from GustoMSC | gCaptain – Maritime & Offshore.

Deep-Water Lifting: A Challenge for the Industry

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As oil and gas developments go deeper, the risk related to lifting operations is increasing. “Existing standards and regulations don’t sufficiently meet this challenge and this is why DNV now has initiated a joint industry project to ensure a unified safety approach. Fourteen key international offshore players have joined the project,” says Robert A. Oftedal, DNV’s Business Development Leader, Cranes & Lifting.

The development of subsea cranes and lifting appliances has been driven by constant demand for increased lifting capacity, operations in greater water depths and motion compensating systems. This has introduced several technological challenges related to ensuring the reliable execution of subsea lifting operations so that objects can be safely placed on and removed from the seabed.

Ensuring proper design and correct operation, as well as regular inspection and maintenance, is crucial for not only the reliability of a lifting appliance, but also the safety of the personnel and equipment involved.

According to DNV, subsea lifting standards and regulations have not followed the steep curve of technological progress. “Instead, the required safety level has been defined by clients’ specifications, technological boundaries and manufacturers’ considerations, rather than regulatory documents acknowledged by all the stakeholders involved. Some client specifications may also be based on vessel-to-platform lifting and not subsea lifting. This situation is a challenge when contracting new equipment,” Oftedal explains.

While various measures are undertaken by different parties, implementing standards and regulatory requirements has proven to be one of the most efficient ways of reducing the risks involved in offshore operations.

“This is why DNV has invited the industry to develop a unified approach concerning important aspects of subsea lifting. The aim is to increase efficiency and safety during the equipment’s design, operation and maintenance phases,” he says.

Fourteen key industry players have joined the project and will present their conclusions in a Recommended Practice within a year. The participants are: Statoil, Petrobras, Lundin Norway, Marathon Oil Norge, Technip, Subsea7, SAIPEM, Heerema Marine Contractors, Cargotec, Liebherr Werk Nenzing, TTS Energy, Huse Engineering (incl. Rolls-Royce), SamsonRope and W. Giertsen Services.

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World’s Biggest Crane TAISUN assembles drilling rig

Uploaded by YantaiRaffles on Mar 29, 2010

TAISUN, the largest, strongest crane in the world and dual heavy lift world record holder is seen here installing the 12,000 metric ton deck box of Schahin’s semi-submersible drilling unit “SS Amazonia”. This video was taken during March 2010 in Yantai, China at Yantai Raffles Shipyard.

Drill Tower Lift-Off record

Uploaded by HeavyLiftSpecialist on Aug 15, 2011

Lifting of a 2340 tons drill tower onto the new drillship Noble Globetrotter at the Huisman yard in Schiedam, the Netherlands on 6th of Aug. 2011

As lifting is done from 5 lifting lugs below the Center of Gravity, stability of the load is crucial.

Original Video

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