Blog Archives

Chart of the Week: Slowest Economic Recovery Since the 1960s

Rob Bluey

November 4, 2012 at 11:35 am

Read more: Here

THE TRUTH ABOUT THE FISCAL CLIFF

Mamta Badkar | May 17, 2012, 10:54 AM

Investors and analysts everywhere are warning of the fiscal cliff that is approaching at the end of 2012 that could significantly hit the American economy.

Unless Congress acts, more than $600 billion in tax and spending provisions will change at the end of the year. And this will impose fiscal restraint at a time when the U.S. economy is growing very gradually.

But what is the fiscal cliff? What impact could it have on the economy? What are the most likely scenarios? And which companies most exposed to government spending stand to take a hit?

Click here to see the truth about the fiscal cliff >

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Former Obama Econ Adviser Makes A Convincing Case That Things Could Suddenly Go Bad

imageJoe Weisenthal

Think everything’s fine in the US economy?

Austan Goolsbee — Obama’s former top econ advisor — is not so sure.

In a comment to Ben White’s Morning Money at POLITICO, Goolsbee explains how easily it could all slip away.

‘Unlike in other V-shaped recoveries from recessions, we cannot go back to what we were doing before … We have to shift away from housing and consumption to exporting and investing and that’s a very slow process … And the world has not been tremendously friendly to enabling us to do that. Europeans have fumbled and fumbled their way to negative growth … And China is slowing while the price of gas is going up. There are definitely some clouds. I’m not pessimistic. I’m just guardedly optimistic. … Productivity grows 2 percent a year. So if the growth rate slows to around 2 percent then the job market will stop improving and the unemployment rate will start going back up again. …

Read more at Morning Money >

CHART: Where We Are In The Failure Of The Fiat Currency Structure

image

Good honest charts never go out of fashion (although we have “moved” along the chart for the past year).

Probably still the best “one chart says it all”.

Click here to enlarge.

This post originally appeared at The Trader.

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