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Graphic of the Day: Drilling Permits Down 36% Under Obama Administration

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When the president says he is opening up millions of acres for drilling exploration in the United States, Cavuto says you might want to thank the previous presidents instead, including Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. According to the Bureau of Land Management, the current administration has actually decreased approval of drilling permits by 36 percent. Even under Bill Clinton, his administration increased the approval of drilling permits by 58 percent, and George W. Bush increased approval by 116 percent.

But what about more drilling? Will an increase in domestic production make a dent on oil prices? Some analysts say “yes”. Cavuto showed a graphic of current drilling sites in the United States vs. the amount of land that we ‘could’ drill on. You can decide for yourself:

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So how much potential oil-energy does the U.S. really have domestically? Jim Angle reports that some energy analysts say the U.S. could have up to 1.4 trillion barrels of ‘recoverable’ or potential barrels of oil yet to be drilled. This means the U.S. has the potential to have more drill-able oil than Saudi Arabia.

However, these analysts results are at odds with the president’s estimates. The Obama administration says the U.S. only has 21 billion barrels of proven reserves, and drilling more will not lower gas prices.

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What do you think? Will more domestic drilling decrease your pay at the pump?

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Obama’s Words Don’t Match with Action on Oil and Gas

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Romina Boccia
January 30, 2012 at 3:30 pm

At this State of the Union address, President Obama proudly stated that “American oil production is the highest it’s been in eight years” and declared that his Administration would “open more than 75 percent of our potential offshore oil and gas resources.” While President Obama spoke favorably of the role that oil and gas development play in America, the President’s and his Administration’s actions don’t match with his words.

There are several areas where the President and his Administration are unreasonably hindering access to more oil and gas for Americans and threatening the industry with punitive measures:

  • Keystone permit rejection. The Keystone XL pipeline would deliver oil from our Canadian ally, relieve some of the pain of high prices at the gas pump, and create jobs in America. Nevertheless, and despite a State Department environmental review concluding that the project poses no significant environmental risk, the President chose to reject TransCanada’s permit application to build the pipeline.
  • Targeted tax hikes. The President continues to threaten the oil industry with targeted tax hikes. Under the rhetoric of eliminating subsidies for the industry, the President’s proposal would eliminate certain tax treatments for oil that are available to many industries, effectively singling out the oil industry for a tax hike.
  • Slowdown of production on federal lands. While American oil production has been increasing, the vast majority of that production is taking place on private lands. Production on federal lands is actually 40 percent lower than it was 10 years ago. The House Natural Resources Committee also reports that under the Obama Administration, 2010 had the lowest number of onshore leases issued since 1984.
  • Fracking regulation. Hydraulic fracturing (or “fracking”) is a proven oil and gas extraction process that should not be subject to overly burdensome regulations. The Environmental Protection Agency is currently considering federal regulation of the fracking process under the Safe Drinking Water Act. The problem is that the agency is following a procedure that even the Department of Energy criticized for its “selective focus” on “negative outcomes.”

Words alone will not make energy more abundant and affordable, nor will they create the energy-related jobs that would make the American economy stronger. If the President is truly concerned about increasing America’s energy access, he certainly has a funny way of showing it.

For policies in that direction, Heritage policy analyst Nick Loris explains in two papers how to make gas and electricity prices more affordable and how to create jobs and raise government revenue through energy exploration.

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Obama’s obligation to free up Gulf oil

More oil-drilling permits would bolster economy and decrease deficit

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By Lori LeBlanc
The Washington Times

One year ago last week, President Obama lifted his moratorium on deepwater drilling that five months earlier had halted operations on 33 rigs producing energy in the Gulf of Mexico. Since then, the industry has worked tirelessly to comply with new federal regulations and permitting requirements, while independently developing and implementing operating practices designed to further enhance safety and environmental protection on deepwater rigs. Yet a full year after the moratorium was lifted, federal permitting for drilling in the Gulf continues to greatly lag behind America’s demand – and capacity – for domestic energy development.

Every day, thousands of Americans whose livelihoods depend on a healthy Gulf energy industry feel the impact of the Gulf slowdown through lost wages, delayed jobs and a general sense of unpredictability about the future of an industry they count on to put food on the table. Local, state and federal government budgets also feel the impact through decreased sales tax and royalty revenue. The Gulf energy industry stands ready and waiting to provide jobs to a nation desperately in need of them. It’s high time to put American energy back to work.

In the wake of the Gulf spill, industry and government have collaborated in an unprecedented effort to rethink and re-engineer safety and response procedures and capabilities in the Gulf of Mexico. Workers are ready to get back to work fueling this nation. The rest lies in the hands of the Department of the Interior, whose regulators verify compliance and issue permits for exploration and drilling operations. Unfortunately, this permitting process continues to move at a pace that does not reflect an industry’s capability to invest and create good-paying jobs.

Permits are essential to the industry’s viability. Since the deepwater moratorium was lifted, only 14 permits have been issued for unique new wells allowing operators to drill to full depth for the purpose of production. For such a capital-intensive industry, where each new deepwater drill ship costs about $1 billion and employs hundreds of workers, those 14 permits over an entire year are simply insufficient to meet production demand or even to keep rigs in the Gulf. Of the original 33 rigs affected by the moratorium, 10 have left the Gulf in favor of markets where permitting is more predictable and transparent. Given the time and expense required to move these floating factories, it’s unlikely they’ll return anytime soon.

The most glaring loss, however, is the significant job opportunities forsaken each and every day as the permitting slowdown lingers. A recent study by IHS CERA concluded that a more-efficient and timely permitting process could create more than 200,000 new jobs in the United States, one-third of which would be generated outside the Gulf region in states like California, Florida, Illinois, Pennsylvania and New York. In today’s world, that amounts to a stimulus package in itself – and one that doesn’t require American taxpayers to foot the bill.

In fact, a healthy Gulf industry puts money back into the pockets of American taxpayers via revenue flows to the U.S. Treasury. The offshore industry paid $8.3 billion in royalties and $9.4 billion in new lease bids in 2008. In 2010, those numbers shrank to $4 billion in royalties and $979 million in lease bids. While the numbers for 2011 aren’t in yet, they’re likely on track with 2010 figures. Yet, according to the IHS CERA study, an industry operating under an improved permitting process could generate $12 billion in tax and royalty revenues by 2012.

The last ripple effect of the permitting slowdown may not pinch Americans today, but it has the potential to hit our pocketbooks in the months and years to come. By allowing rigs to depart the Gulf and discouraging the large-scale investment necessary to meet our future energy needs, our government’s lack of urgency to restoring Gulf energy puts us all in a precarious position. If and when we decide to harness the true potential of the Gulf, we may find that the investment and equipment simply isn’t there. This translates to greater reliance on foreign suppliers, less control of our own energy supplies, and living in the hope that unforeseen political developments somewhere overseas don’t push prices at the pump even higher.

The Gulf has a lot to offer Americans: jobs, revenue and a valuable domestic energy supply. A multitude of American workers are motivated to get back to work today. Virtually every American stands to gain by encouraging investment in domestic energy production. It’s time for our government to clear the permitting bottlenecks for Gulf drilling activity and get this nation back to work with American energy.

Lori LeBlanc is the executive director of the Gulf Economic Survival Team.

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Obama’s Anti-Energy Policies Are Bankrupting America

Published on May 5, 2011 by HeritageFoundation

Randall Stilley has witnessed firsthand the Obama administration‘s job-killing agenda. As the president and chief executive of Seahawk Drilling, he had to lay off 632 employees before filing for bankruptcy — a direct result of President Obama’s anti-energy policies.

“As an American,” he told us, “you never want to look at your own government and say they’re hurting you personally, they’re hurting your business and they’re doing it in a way that’s irresponsible. I’m not very proud of our government right now and the way they handled this.”

Randall Stilley has witnessed firsthand the Obama administration’s job-killing agenda. As the president and chief executive of Seahawk Drilling, he had to lay off 632 employees before filing for bankruptcy — a direct result of President Barack Obama’s anti-energy policies.

Stilley’s company owned and operated 20 shallow-water rigs in the Gulf of Mexico. The lack of energy production — a consequence of Obama’s drilling moratorium and subsequent “permitorium” — led to Seahawk’s demise. Now he’s speaking out, sharing Seahawk’s story in a new video from Heritage and the Institute for Energy Research. (Click to watch.)

It’s an unfortunate example of how policies in Washington are harming American jobs and also squelching energy production at a time when consumers are paying $4-per-gallon for gasoline.

Fortunately, not everyone in the nation’s capital is content with higher prices and fewer jobs. Today the U.S. House considers the first of several bills that directly addresses energy and jobs. Lawmakers will vote today on legislation that requires the Obama administration to conduct oil and natural gas lease sales in the Gulf of Mexico and in the waters offshore Virginia.

It’s a welcome change from the anti-drilling policies first imposed by the Obama administration one year ago. On May 6, 2010, the first moratorium on Gulf drilling took effect, followed by a longer ban that lasted until October. But even after it was lifted, few deepwater permits have been issued.

The long-term implications are disastrous for America. That prompted House Natural Resources Chairman Doc Hastings (R-WA) to pursue a remedy through legislation. Today’s vote would ensure that companies continue energy development by requiring lease sales. Two other bills would speed up the permitting process and craft a long-term plan for offshore lease sales.

“What we’re proposing is to lower gas prices, create American jobs, which ironically will help drive up government revenues, and ultimately, in the wake of all the turmoil we’ve seen in the world, create an environment in which we are energy independent or on a path to energy independence,” Rep. Peter Roskam (R-IL) explained yesterday.

Even without the president’s signature, the legislation has already had a positive impact. After it passed in committee, the Obama administration promised to hold one lease sale in 2011. (Ever since 1958, there has been at least one lease sale every year.)

But while one lease sale is better than none, Hastings isn’t satisfied. He wants the Obama administration to hold four lease sales before June 2012  – including one off the coast of Virginia.

Aside from creating new jobs and discovering new sources of energy, the lease sales contribute a substantial sum of revenue for the federal treasury. In 2008, the offshore industry paid $9.4 billion for bids on new leases. Last year, that figure dropped to $979 million in lease bids.

The drop in revenue is a reflection of the Obama administration’s anti-energy policies. And lease sales are only part of the equation. According to the government’s own Energy Information Administration, production in the Gulf of Mexico will drop by 190,000 barrels per day. That means less money from royalty payments on offshore rigs as well.

Faced with mounting criticism, the Obama administration has defended its policies as a safety precaution following last year’s oil spill. But one year later, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement is issuing drilling permits at such a slow pace that it’s hard to swallow the explanation.

At the same time, the Obama administration and Democrats in Congress are seeking new ways to penalize energy businesses. As Curtis Dubay and Nick Loris write on The Foundry, a proposal from Senate Finance Chairman Max Baucus (D-MT) would significantly increase taxes paid by U.S. oil and gas companies competing abroad — exactly the wrong approach with gas prices on the rise.

Meanwhile, job creators like Leslie Bertucci and Randall Stilley continue to bear the brunt of the Obama administration’s misguided policies. Bertucci, who told us last month about her company’s struggle to survive, has dipped into personal savings to avoid layoffs.

Stilley didn’t have that option at Seahawk. And he’s not optimistic about what the future holds under this administration.

“As an American,” he told us, “you never want to look at your own government and say they’re hurting you personally, they’re hurting your business and they’re doing it in a way that’s irresponsible. I’m not very proud of our government right now and the way they handled this.”

Original Article

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