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Interwell raises the bar in well intervention technology

Uploaded by Interwell100 on Jul 14, 2011

Interwell High Pressure High Temperature (HPHT) Mechanical Retrievable Bridge Plug. We have developed a bridge plug for the oil and gas industry. This is a demonstration of the HPHT Bridge Plug to be used in different applications such as Water Shut Off, Temporary Barrier Plug and Reservoir Well Intervention

THE world’s first high pressure (HP) retrievable bridge plug capable of withstanding a differential pressure of 15,000psi was today (Tuesday, 6 September) unveiled at Offshore Europe by high-technology well intervention specialist Interwell.

Interwell developed the ultra slim, 2.2” OD, HP bridge plug to provide a reliable barrier in extremely high pressure conditions.

The ISO 14310 qualified tool contains an innovative packer back-up design which both compresses and constrains the element, reducing the risk of extrusion in extreme conditions and enables its operation to 15,000psi.

“We have established a new standard with this tool as we are the only company in the industry to develop a plug which can withstand such high pressures and is fully retrievable after use,” says Interwell’s UK managing director, Andrew Louden.

“This tool is a significant development in terms of its global applicability in ultra-deepwater environments, and from our perspective is a further major design and engineering achievement in a portfolio which already includes the highest-expansion ultra-slim bridge plugs available.”

The ultra-slim design of the patented element back-up segments of the HP plug reduces the risk of deployment and retrieval through narrow wellbore restrictions, a crucial operational benefit in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) wells.

Efficiency is further enhanced by each plug taking just one run to set and one to retrieve, providing a reliable and cost effective solution for well interventions.

Jim Laidlaw, business development director at Interwell Aberdeen, says: “Intervening in deepwater and HPHT wells is very demanding. Our key design aim was to develop the slimmest HP plug solutions in the market whilst also minimising operational complexity in these challenging well conditions.

“With a range of plug sizes for 3-1/2” to 7-5/8 casings, the ultra slim HPHT plug design makes it an ideal barrier solution for wellbores with any form of restriction, allowing it to be deployed reliably to the desired depth.

“Our plugs have been designed so they can be used as both shallow and deep barriers, making them ideally suited to workover applications. They can also be used to anchor injection valves and equalisation devices.”

The tool can be run on slickline, e-line, coiled tubing or pipe and as with all of Interwell’s plugs and packers, it features a scale tolerant slip design ensuring that it adequately grips the casing.

Interwell offers some of the most advanced well barrier solutions available in the upstream oil and gas sector, and it is the world’s leading independent supplier of retrievable bridge plugs.
Its product portfolio has already successfully passed qualification testing in gas with very high pressures up to 15,000 psi and at temperatures up to 200°C. The company intends to continue developing plugs which can withstand more extreme conditions using its field proven design.

Each of Interwell’s portfolio of solutions can be tailored to solve individual project requirements with very short lead times, providing a rapid response for clients. Interwell also has in-house testing facilities where they can qualify plugs and packers to the ISO 14310 V0 standard.

In February 2011, the firm opened a new facility in Aberdeen as it embarked on an ambitious international growth strategy. The Aberdeen office has created 17 new jobs within the first 6 months of operations and expects to double in size over the next 12 months.

Interwell has offices in Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi and Oman, in addition to its operations in Norway and the UK.

Link www.interwell.com

Original Article

Sarah: deepwater intervention vessel

Sarah: deepwater intervention vessel

The SX121 vessel is designed as state of the art multipurpose/intervention vessel with multiple usage functions – particularly well suited for deep water subsea intervention and well interventions.
Key Features:
Length: 120m
Width: 25m
Draft: 7.5m
Deck Area: 1470m2
Accommodation: 100 persons (40 single and 30 double cabins)
Deck Crane: 140t heavy compensated down to 2500m
ROV Systems: 2 x workclass to 3000m (Oceaneering)
Dead Weight: 8,700t
Speed: 14.5 knots
Well Intervention Depth: 2,500m

Strong Recovery in Subsea Vessel Demand

Market researcher Douglas-Westwood, UK, forecasts strong recovery in vessel demand. The World Subsea Vessel Operations Market 2011-2015 details expenditure set to grow 52%, totaling USD72bn between 2011 and 2015. Lead author, Simon Robb, commented, “Project timetables are accelerating as confidence returns to the industry, with a shift to larger and more complex deepwater projects. Projects are increasingly capital intensive, which is benefitting offshore contractors with the capability and expertise to provide deepwater services.

Offshore support vessel

“Global vessel demand for Subsea Vessels is expected to climb beyond 310,000 days for the forecast period 2011-2015 – a 28% increase on the previous five years. Robust growth is expected, with annual expenditure set to rise from USD11.2bn in 2011 to USD19bn by 2015.”

Ian Jones, contributing author, continued, “By 2015, there will be a move towards more complex deepwater projects being sanctioned and this should benefit the vessel contractors with deepwater capability and engineering experience. The number of vessel days in deep waters is set to increase by more than 50% over the next five years. Deepwater awards will suit contractors with modern vessels fleet, effective project execution skills and a track record in delivering deepwater projects.”

The deepwater ‘Golden Triangle’ is expected to account for 54% of global expenditure over the forecast period. Africa will remain the largest single market by expenditure with over USD13.7bn required over the next five years. Despite a dip in activity in North America during 2011-2012, due to the economic crisis and the fallout from the Deepwater Horizon incident, vessel expenditure is expected to total almost USD13bn. This is a 21% increase on the previous five years. Latin America is expected to be the third largest market – driven directly by Petrobras‘ long-term deepwater and ultra-deepwater strategy. The Asian and Australasian regions are both expected to witness strong vessel expenditure growth over the next five years.

The comprehensive report focuses on the demand for vessels used by operators around the world for their subsea field development & construction projects, inspection, repair & maintenance (IRM), well intervention and plug & abandonment activities providing detailed demand and expenditure analysis by region. The report looks at the main factors that are driving vessel day demand for ROVSV, DSV, Flexlay, LWIV and Pipelay vessels and provides supporting information analyzing specific sectors within each key subsea sector. Market supply and vessel day rates are also discussed, providing the reader with a comprehensive understanding of the key trends involved in shaping the requirement for subsea vessels.

Original Article

Strong Recovery in Subsea Vessel Demand

Market researcher Douglas-Westwood, UK, forecasts strong recovery in vessel demand. The World Subsea Vessel Operations Market 2011-2015 details expenditure set to grow 52%, totalling USD72bn between 2011 and 2015. Lead author, Simon Robb, commented, “Project timetables are accelerating as confidence returns to the industry, with a shift to larger and more complex deepwater projects. Projects are increasingly capital intensive, which is benefitting offshore contractors with the capability and expertise to provide deepwater services.

Offshore support vessel

“Global vessel demand for Subsea Vessels is expected to climb beyond 310,000 days for the forecast period 2011-2015 – a 28% increase on the previous five years. Robust growth is expected, with annual expenditure set to rise from USD11.2bn in 2011 to USD19bn by 2015.”

Ian Jones, contributing author, continued, “By 2015, there will be a move towards more complex deepwater projects being sanctioned and this should benefit the vessel contractors with deepwater capability and engineering experience. The number of vessel days in deep waters is set to increase by more than 50% over the next five years. Deepwater awards will suit contractors with modern vessels fleet, effective project execution skills and a track record in delivering deepwater projects.”

The deepwater ‘Golden Triangle’ is expected to account for 54% of global expenditure over the forecast period. Africa will remain the largest single market by expenditure with over USD13.7bn required over the next five years. Despite a dip in activity in North America during 2011-2012, due to the economic crisis and the fallout from the Deepwater Horizon incident, vessel expenditure is expected to total almost USD13bn. This is a 21% increase on the previous five years. Latin America is expected to be the third largest market – driven directly by Petrobras‘ long-term deepwater and ultra-deepwater strategy. The Asian and Australasian regions are both expected to witness strong vessel expenditure growth over the next five years.

The comprehensive report focuses on the demand for vessels used by operators around the world for their subsea field development & construction projects, inspection, repair & maintenance (IRM), well intervention and plug & abandonment activities providing detailed demand and expenditure analysis by region. The report looks at the main factors that are driving vessel day demand for ROVSV, DSV, Flexlay, LWIV and Pipelay vessels and provides supporting information analysing specific sectors within each key subsea sector. Market supply and vessel day rates are also discussed, providing the reader with a comprehensive understanding of the key trends involved in shaping the requirement for subsea vessels.

Original Article

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