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USA: Sierra Club Opposes Cameron LNG Export Plans

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The Sierra Club filed a formal protest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on Tuesday, challenging a proposal to export billions of cubic feet of domestic natural gas from a facility on Lake Charles in Cameron Parish, LA.

The Sierra Club’s protest challenges natural gas companies’ efforts to secure liquefied natural gas (LNG) export licenses without acknowledging its damaging effects. DOE is currently studying the effects of exporting as much as a fifth of the domestic gas supply, and the Sierra Club calls for similar studies of the public health and environmental damage caused by increased fracking.

The Sierra Club’s challenge contends that the Cameron export proposal would lead to increased air and water pollution in Louisiana and Texas and raise domestic natural gas prices. The filing calls for a full Environmental Impact Statement to study the extent of this proposed facility’s environmental damages before DOE makes any final decisions. Weighing these threats is particularly important because the oil and gas industry currently exploits numerous loopholes and exceptions in federal safeguards, putting the health and safety of Americans at risk.

This filing is the fifth protest the Sierra Club has brought before DOE and other regulatory bodies, opposing LNG export facilities. The other challenges were filed against Cove Point, MD, Sabine Pass, LA, Coos Bay, OR, and Freeport, TX.

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Blackstone to Invest $2 Billion in Cheniere Energy in Bet on LNG Expansion

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By Jim Polson – Feb 27, 2012 7:49 AM CT

Cheniere Energy Partners LP (CQP) said Blackstone Group LP (BX) agreed to invest $2 billion toward construction of a $5 billion natural-gas export terminal.

The financing is a “significant milestone” toward Cheniere’s plan to build the plant, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Charif Souki said in a statement today. If built, the plant would be the first constructed in more than four decades to export U.S. natural gas by ship.

Cheniere Energy is seeking final approval from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for the plant, which would liquefy gas for export from its existing import terminal in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The Houston-based company obtained Energy Department approval to export after U.S. production of the fuel surged from hydraulic fracturing.

“Obtaining this financing will be a significant milestone for the advancement of construction for the first two liquefaction units,” Charif Souki, chairman and chief executive officer of Cheniere Energy Partners and its parent, Cheniere Energy Inc. (LNG), said in today’s statement.

The Blackstone entities have agreed to buy 111 million new senior subordinated paid-in-kind units for $18 billion each, according to the statement. Final terms are contingent on Cheniere securing debt financing.

Starting Construction

Cheniere expects to obtain the remaining financing by March 31 and to begin construction by June 30, according to the statement.

The units that Blackstone is buying will pay 4.2 percent interest quarterly and convert to partnership common units once the first two sections of the plant begin commercial operation. Cheniere Energy Partners will use cash from the sale to buy the pipeline that connects the terminal to the U.S. gas pipeline network from Cheniere Energy Inc., according to today’s statement.

The announcement was made before regular trading began on U.S. markets. Cheniere Energy Partners rose 6.7 percent to $22.30 at 8:46 a.m. in New York. Cheniere Energy Inc. rose 17 percent to $16.42.

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USA: Sabine Pass LNG Gets Cargo

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The U.S. Sabine Pass liquefied natural gas terminal received an LNG cargo yesterday, according to shipping data.

The Arctic Spirit, owned by Teekay LNG, has a capacity of 87.305 cbm.

Cheniere’s Sabine Pass LNG terminal  is located on 853 acres of land along the Sabine Pass River on the border between Texas and Louisiana, in Cameron Parish.

It  has regasification and send-out capacity of 4.0 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) and storage capacity of 16.9 billion cubic feet equivalent (Bcfe).

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