Daily Archives: September 3, 2013

Egyptian Media Outs Obama, Claims President Member Of Muslim Brotherhood

September 3, 2013
By Joseph R. Carducci

This does not probably come as a big surprise to most of our regular readers, but there have been some stories reported in the Egyptian media that claim our very own Commander in Chief is indeed a card carrying member of the Muslim Brotherhood.

The source of all this might, however, be a bit of a surprise. Al Jazeera recently claimed that an Egyptian newspaper says they have actual proof of Obama being an actual member of the Muslim Brotherhood. No, we are not talking about a supporter or even someone who is just sympathetic to the cause. After all, everyone already knows that at the very least Obama is sympathetic to their cause. At the VERY least! Nope, this paper claims they have hard, physical evidence of Obama being an actual, card-carrying member of this terrorist group.

A Qatar-owned international news outlet also recently posted a short story that made this same claim. They stated basically the same thing: that at least one, and perhaps several, Egyptian newspaper sources are claiming Obama is a member of the Muslim Brotherhood. Also, the director of research at the Brookings Doha Center, Shadi Hamid tweeted about these claims: “If you missed it, ‘liberal’ Egyptian newspaper has front page headline claiming Obama as a full-on member of Muslim Brotherhood International.” He also stated in another tweet that the son of Muslim Brotherhood leader actually threatened Obama with release of ‘papers’ revealing his membership status.

Still another source confirms these events. Turkey’s news agency, Anatolia, recently reported an interview with Saad Al-Shater. This man is the son of the imprisoned Muslim Brotherhood leader Khairat Al-Shater. The report indicated that the son actually had some incriminating evidence against Obama, proving he is ‘very’ involved with the Muslim Brotherhood.

These are certainly interesting claims, even if they have yet to be proven. Perhaps they are aimed at given Obama some signals for direction as to his Middle East policy? You will probably also find it curious that no actual evidence was released. So, it is a mixed bag. On the one hand, it is difficult to believe anything that is said by outlets like Al Jazeera. But more moderate news agencies such as Anatolia should make people start to sit up and take notice. This is not run by a bunch of Muslims intent on imposing Sharia law, but rather one of the most secular and forward thinking administrations in this part of the world.

It is the inclusion of Anatolia in this reporting mix that has me quite interested. Personally, having thought that at the very least Obama was ‘very’ involved in this group, all of this seems to make a lot of sense. After all, just take a look at all of the things Obama has done over the last two years. How he has handled the situations in Egypt and Syria so poorly. I mean, he has done almost everything wrong and committed almost every mistake possible. The only plausible way to explain all of these clearly wrong-headed decisions and policies would be if there were some Muslim Brotherhood advisors helping to make and change policy in the Obama Regime itself.

Well, perhaps there is indeed a very critical member, the leader himself. Would it really be that surprising or difficult to believe that our wonderful POTUS is indeed just such a member? Honestly, we would love to know if this is something that would actually surprise you…and if yes, what exactly were you hoping to find in Obama?

Source

Special report: We all thought Libya had moved on – it has, but into lawlessness and ruin

Libya has plunged unnoticed into its worst political and economic crisis since the defeat of Gaddafi

 
Tuesday 03 September 2013
by Patrick Cockburn

A little under two years ago, Philip Hammond, the Defence Secretary, urged British businessmen to begin “packing their suitcases” and to fly to Libya to share in the reconstruction of the country and exploit an anticipated boom in natural resources.

Yet now Libya has almost entirely stopped producing oil as the government loses control of much of the country to militia fighters.

Mutinying security men have taken over oil ports on the Mediterranean and are seeking to sell crude oil on the black market. Ali Zeidan, Libya’s Prime Minister, has threatened to “bomb from the air and the sea” any oil tanker trying to pick up the illicit oil from the oil terminal guards, who are mostly former rebels who overthrew Muammar Gaddafi and have been on strike over low pay and alleged government corruption since July.

As world attention focused on the coup in Egypt and the poison gas attack in Syria over the past two months, Libya has plunged unnoticed into its worst political and economic crisis since the defeat of Gaddafi two years ago. Government authority is disintegrating in all parts of the country putting in doubt claims by American, British and French politicians that Nato’s military action in Libya in 2011 was an outstanding example of a successful foreign military intervention which should be repeated in Syria.

In an escalating crisis little regarded hitherto outside the oil markets, output of Libya’s prized high-quality crude oil has plunged from 1.4 million barrels a day earlier this year to just 160,000 barrels a day now. Despite threats to use military force to retake the oil ports, the government in Tripoli has been unable to move effectively against striking guards and mutinous military units that are linked to secessionist forces in the east of the country.

Libyans are increasingly at the mercy of militias which act outside the law. Popular protests against militiamen have been met with gunfire; 31 demonstrators were shot dead and many others wounded as they protested outside the barracks of “the Libyan Shield Brigade” in the eastern capital Benghazi in June.

Though the Nato intervention against Gaddafi was justified as a humanitarian response to the threat that Gaddafi’s tanks would slaughter dissidents in Benghazi, the international community has ignored the escalating violence. The foreign media, which once filled the hotels of Benghazi and Tripoli, have likewise paid little attention to the near collapse of the central government.

The strikers in the eastern region Cyrenaica, which contains most of Libya’s oil, are part of a broader movement seeking more autonomy and blaming the government for spending oil revenues in the west of the country. Foreigners have mostly fled Benghazi since the American ambassador, Chris Stevens, was murdered in the US consulate by jihadi militiamen last September. Violence has worsened since then with Libya’s military prosecutor Colonel Yussef Ali al-Asseifar, in charge of investigating assassinations of politicians, soldiers and journalists, himself assassinated by a bomb in his car on 29 August.

Rule by local militias is also spreading anarchy around the capital. Ethnic Berbers, whose militia led the assault on Tripoli in 2011, temporarily took over the parliament building in Tripoli. The New York-based Human Rights Watch has called for an independent investigation into the violent crushing of a prison mutiny in Tripoli on 26 August in which 500 prisoners had been on hunger strike. The hunger strikers were demanding that they be taken before a prosecutor or formally charged since many had been held without charge for two years.

The government called on the Supreme Security Committee, made up of former anti-Gaddafi militiamen nominally under the control of the interior ministry, to restore order. At least 19 prisoners received gunshot shrapnel wounds, with one inmate saying “they were shooting directly at us through the metal bars”. There have been several mass prison escapes this year in Libya including 1,200 escaping from a prison after a riot in Benghazi in July.

The Interior Minister, Mohammed al-Sheikh, resigned last month in frustration at being unable to do his job, saying in a memo sent to Mr Zeidan that he blamed him for failing to build up the army and the police. He accused the government, which is largely dominated by the Muslim Brotherhood, of being weak and dependent on tribal support. Other critics point out that a war between two Libyan tribes, the Zawiya and the Wirrshifana, is going on just 15 miles from the Prime Minister’s office.

Diplomats have come under attack in Tripoli with the EU ambassador’s convoy ambushed outside the Corinthia hotel on the waterfront. A bomb also wrecked the French embassy.

One of the many failings of the post-Gaddafi government is its inability to revive the moribund economy. Libya is wholly dependent on its oil and gas revenues and without these may not be able to pay its civil servants. Sliman Qajam, a member of the parliamentary energy committee, told Bloomberg that “the government is running on its reserves. If the situation doesn’t improve, it won’t be able to pay salaries by the end of the year”.

Source

%d bloggers like this: