Daily Archives: October 6, 2011

Alice, Texas – 1900 to 1990

image

Alice Cotton Oil Co’s Plant, Alice, Texas

During the 1920s, as a result of the oil boom in Jim Wells County, Alice adopted the slogan “Hub City of South Texas.”

By 1900 the town had five churches, three public schools, a kindergarten, and a private Mexican school. The two weekly newspapers serving the town were the Reporter and the Echo. During that period Alice acquired the nickname the “Windmill Town” for its numerous windmills. In 1903 Eulalio Velázquez started publication of El Cosmopolita, a Spanish-language newspaper. Alice was incorporated on June 2, 1904, at which time it had a population of 887. F. B. Nayer owned the town site and donated land for early civic buildings. With the completion of the St. Louis, Brownsville and Mexico Railway to Brownsville in 1904, the Alice-to-Brownsville stagecoach was discontinued. The telephone company was sold to the Eureka Telephone Company in 1904, and the Southwestern Telephone and Telegraph Company started providing long-distance service. Trinidad Salazar was instrumental in getting Alice a new elementary school, which was named for original settler F. B. Nayer. In 1909 a fire destroyed half of the Alice business section, but it was rebuilt and the town continued to grow. Alice was chosen county seat of Jim Wells County shortly after the county’s organization in 1911. The town also became the headquarters for Texas Rangers serving in South Texas during the 1912–16 border raids. By 1914 Alice had an estimated population of 3,500, two banks, a cottonseed oil mill, a cotton gin, an ice plant, and two weeklies, the Alice Echo and the News. The introduction of irrigation helped to continue Alice’s importance as a shipping center, and a shift was made from transporting livestock to transporting fruits and vegetables. During the 1920s, as a result of the oil boom in Jim Wells County, Alice adopted the slogan “Hub City of South Texas.” The town served as the distribution point for both supplies and construction to south Texas. Its population was estimated at 4,239 in 1931. In 1935 a public library opened. The town had an oil boom in 1938, when the Alice oilfield was discovered. By 1940 the population was 7,792.

image

Baptist Church, Alice, Texas

image

Hotel Alice, Alice, Texas

Alice made national headlines during the 1948 primary election for state senator. Lyndon Baines Johnson and Governor Coke Stevensonqqv both ran for the Democratic party nomination. It was alleged that Johnson won the primary because he had stolen the election with the help of George B. Parrqv, political boss, who controlled both Duval and Jim Wells counties. Alice became the focal point of a federal investigation when it was alleged that Alice’s Precinct 13 ballot box had been stuffed. By 1949 violence erupted in Alice. W. H. (Bill) Mason, a local broadcaster, was shot by deputy sheriff Sam Smithwick after he had alleged on the air that Smithwick was the owner of a dime-a-dance palace.

During the 1940s and 1950s Alice had an economy based on the oil and gas industry, livestock production, and the marketing of cotton, flax, grain, and vegetables. Industries manufactured oil-well chemicals and supplies, fiberglass, products, cottonseed oil products, and foods. Census figures indicated a population of 16,414 in 1950. In September 1951 Alice was struck by a flood. In 1960 the population was 20,861. In 1963 Alice had thirteen churches and seven schools. In 1966 the town reported 429 businesses, nineteen manufacturers, twenty churches, two libraries, two newspapers, three banks, a radio station, and a hospital. Around 1966 Mexican-American youths boycotted Alice High School in protest against discrimination on the part of students, teachers, and administrators. Alice had an estimated population of 25,100 and 462 businesses in 1970. During the 1970s the city continued to be an oil and agricultural center. Agribusiness in Alice contributed nearly $34 million annually to the gross income of Jim Wells County. The Alice trade territory embraced a population of more than 150,000 in a forty-mile radius. In 1982 naphthalene and penanthene were found in Alice’s water supply and traced to an oilfield drilling company working in the area. In 1985 there were over 250 oil and mineral industry companies in the area. At the time Alice had eleven public schools and two parochial schools, twenty-nine churches, a museum, a public library, a private hospital, 557 businesses, and ninety-four major employers. In 1990 Alice had a population of 19,788. In 2000 the population dropped to 19,010.

Timeline of Texas History – Alice

Alice, Texas – 1888 to 1900

image

Frontier Battalion Co. “E” Alice, Texas 1892.

The town’s first school was established in 1888 on the second floor of the Becham Place, a boardinghouse for men. The private school had nine students. Until 1886 Alice students who chose to continue their education attended Goliad College. The Catholic church at Collins was moved to Alice in 1889. Methodist services were held at Mrs. E. D. Sidbury’s lumberyard until 1890, when they were moved to a new school built by George Hobbs. A school board of trustees was elected, and a public school was started. In 1892 the town was served by a hotel, two saloons, two general stores, a weekly newspaper named the Alice Reporter, and a cotton gin. The San Antonio and Aransas Pass Railway had completed its line to Alice. By 1894 Alice was the busiest shipping point in South Texas. The Alice Circuit of the Methodist Church was formed in 1895. By 1896 the town had an estimated population of 885, a library, a bank, the Episcopal Church of the Advent, and a second weekly newspaper, El Eco. The first telephone exchange in Alice was established by the Beeville, Alice, and Wade City Telephone Company in 1896. The first two telephones in the community were located at Trinidad Salazar‘s general store and home. In 1898 Alice flooded, forcing residents to move their houses. In February 1899 a smallpox epidemic hit one of Alice’s Mexican subdivisions, then located on the outskirts of the town. Consequently, the area was quarantined, and the two private Mexican schools in Alice were forced to close down. The epidemic became so widespread that the county commissioner ordered all schools closed and fumigated and authorized the county health officer to vaccinate every one in the area free of charge.

Timeline of Texas History – Alice

Uganda, Obama, Oil and Soros

image

Obama’s Uganda Gambit to serve Soros

By Ed Lasky, American Thinker
October 18, 2011

Journalist Aaron Klein has an interesting take on Barack Obama’s surprising decision to send troops into Uganda to battle a rebel army.  The genesis of the idea may have begun at the George Soros-funded International Crisis Group, one of the “think tanks” that Soros uses to promote policies that benefit him.  In this case, the ICG recommended last year that America deploy military forces to Uganda.  This move prompted questions since the rebel group did not pose a threat to American interests. But whose interests might be served by defeating the rebel group? George Soros — a major Obama backer.

Klein writes:

Soros himself has been closely tied to oil and other interests in Uganda.

In 2008, the Soros-funded Revenue Watch Institute brought together stakeholders from Uganda and other East African countries to discuss critical governance issues, including the formation of what became Uganda’s National Oil and Gas Policy.

Also in 2008, the Africa Institute for Energy Governance, a grantee of the Soros-funded Revenue Watch, helped established the Publish What You Pay Coalition of Uganda, or PWYP, which was purportedly launched to coordinate and streamline the efforts of the government in promoting transparency and accountability in the oil sector.

Also, a steering committee was formed for PWYP Uganda to develop an agenda for implementing the oil advocacy initiatives and a constitution to guide PWYP’s oil work.

PWYP has since 2006 hosted a number of training workshops in Uganda purportedly to promote contract transparency in Uganda’s oil sector.

PWYP is directly funded by Soros’ Open Society as well as the Soros-funded Revenue Watch Institute. PWYP international is actually hosted by the Open Society Foundation in London.

The billionaire’s Open Society Institute, meanwhile, runs numerous offices in Uganda. It maintains a country manager in Uganda, as well as the Open Society Initiative for East Africa, which supports work in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda.

Keep reading …

Source

Enhanced by Zemanta

Dockwise to move Big Foot

image

Dockwise will transport Chevron’s Big Foot platform hull from Daewoo‘s South Korea facility to the Gulf of Mexico next year. Dockwise announced the transport deal, along with eight other short-term contracts, on 5 October 2011. The transport specialist pegged the contracts at a value of over $55 million this year and next.

Daewoo cut first steel for the Big Foot hull in July 2011 and is to deliver the hull by the end of 2012.

In December 2010, Chevron sanctioned its operated $4 billion Big Foot development in the Lower Tertiary trend of the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. Located in 5200ft of water, Chevron is developing the field with an extended TLP using dry trees and an on-board drilling rig. The facility will have production capacity of 75,000b/d of oil and 25mmcf/d of natural gas. Chevron expects first oil in 2014.

Chevron discovered the field in 2006 in Walker Ridge block 29. The field holds estimated recoverable resources of over 200 million boe.
Chevron operates the project with 60% interest on behalf of partners Statoil (27.5%) and Marubeni (12.5%).

Jennifer Pallanich, Managing Editor, Offshore Engineer

by: Jennifer Pallanich,
jpallanich@offshore-engineer.com 

Original Article


Russia: Gazprom Discovers New Offshore Field Near Sakhalin III

image

As a result of geological exploration, Gazprom discovered a new field within the Mynginskaya geological structure in the Kirinsky prospect of the Sakhalin III project.

Gas and condensate inflow was reported in the prospecting well during the exploration operations. The well testing will be followed by the reserves estimation.

The new field was the second discovery in the Kirinsky prospect.

Background

Gazprom carries out geological exploration in the Sakhalin shelf as part of the state-run Development Program for an integrated gas production, transportation and supply system in Eastern Siberia and the Far East, taking into account potential gas exports to China and other Asia-Pacific countries. The Program was approved by the September 2007 Order of the Russian Federation Industry and Energy Ministry. Gazprom was appointed by the Russian Federation Government as the Program execution coordinator.

Gazprom holds subsurface use licenses for the Kirinskoye field, the Kirinsky prospect (including Yuzhno-Kirinskoye field) and the Vostochno-Odoptinsky and Ayashsky licensed blocks within the Sakhalin III project. Natural gas produced by Gazprom within the project will be delivered into the Sakhalin – KhabarovskVladivostok gas transmission system.

Based on the results of the geological exploration performed between 2009 and 2010, Gazprom increased the Kirinskoye gas and condensate field reserves from 75 billion cubic meters of C1+C2 gas to 137 billion cubic meters of C1 gas. The recoverable condensate reserves rose from 8.6 to 15.9 million tons. It is projected to commission the field in 2012.

In September 2010 Gazprom discovered the large Yuzhno-Kirinskoye field in the Kirinsky prospect. The field’s C1+C2 gas reserves make up 260 billion cubic meters, the recoverable condensate reserves – 29.9 million tons.

Gazflot (a wholly-owned subsidiary of Gazprom) acts as the geological exploration operator.

Original Article

%d bloggers like this: