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OBAMA WANTS TO DESTROY AMERICA

Published on Apr 28, 2012 by TheAmericanMilitiaHQ

OBAMA WANTS TO DESTROY AMERICA! Watch this video and forward the link to your friends who still believe in America. Video content by Free Market America.

Wrecking a Nation: Oil, Dependency, and Redistribution

Monday, 28 March 2011 01:00
Written by  Ralph R. Reiland

Here’s how the economic and political system of a nation is destroyed.

Every price increase of just a dime per gallon of gasoline at the pump extracts approximately $5 billion from the pockets of U.S. consumers over the course of a year.

On top of killing family budgets, with a dollar per gallon jump at the pumps picking our pockets of $50 billion per year, there is on the macro level an inverse relationship between the price of oil and the overall health of the economy — oil price hikes deliver less job growth, less demand for labor, more unemployment, more poverty, more inequality, more inflation, lower real income increases, and smaller advances in the standard of living.

Additionally, higher oil prices directly cause greater amounts of U.S. capital to be exported, both to pay the higher prices and to pay for the growing levels of imported oil.

In 1985, the U.S. imported 25 percent of its oil usage. Today, it’s 61 percent. And still we are placing restrictions on increases in domestic production, both for oil and other sources of energy.

A few days back, President Obama, rather than sticking around a couple hours to explain to the American people or to the U.S. Congress why we were going to war in Libya, flew off to Brazil to hand out a permit to allow deep sea oil drilling in the Gulf of Mexico to Brazil’s state-run oil company, Petrobras. Capitalist companies in America need not apply.

This particular foreign deal was an especially snug and nostalgic fit for Obama. Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff is somewhat of a Latin form of Obama’s old Weather Underground chum Bernardine Dohrn.

In earlier days, Rousseff, a former Marxist guerrilla, was charged with running with a gang of redistributionists who accumulated revolutionary capital by way of kidnapping foreign diplomats for ransom.

A top priority for Rousseff today mirrors the “spread the wealth around” objective that Obama stated to Joe the plumber.

Dohrn, just home from a trip to Cuba in 1969 where she hoped to pick up some pointers on how to impose a “classless” society on the United States, displayed her true psychopathic colors in a speech she made to the Weathermen’s “War Council.” Speaking elatedly of the murders by the Charlie Manson gang of actress Sharon Tate, coffee heiress Abigail Folger, and three other people, Dohrn proclaimed, “First they killed those pigs, then they ate dinner in the same room with them, then they even shoved a fork into the victims’ stomachs! Wild!”

That’s the fully hateful Bernardine on public display, seeing herself as a new George Washington, a revolutionary fighter for a new nation. It’s the same role, except this founding mother was in serious need of a super-sized bottle of antipsychotic drugs and a super-tight straight-jacket.

Of all the places for candidate Obama to kick off his political career in 1995 in his first run for the Illinois State Senate, he picked the living room of Bernardine Dohrn and husband Bill Ayers, co-founder of the Weather Underground and, more recently, the national vice president for curriculum studies at the American Educational Research Association.

I’d have kept up my guard when Bernardine sashayed out of the kitchen and began circulating around with the hor dourves and metal forks.

In any case, it’s no surprise that things are coming apart, especially on energy. “If somebody wants to build a coal-fired plant, they can,” pronounced Obama during the presidential campaign. “It’s just that it will bankrupt them because they’re going to be charged a huge sum for all that greenhouse gas that’s being emitted.”

What’s the end game?  “Suicide Mission Accomplished”?

Ralph R. Reiland is an associate professor of economics at Robert Morris University in Pittsburgh.

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Gulf index still shows oil permits behind

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By Debbie Glover
St. Tammany News

Before oil spill, deep water drilling permits were being issued at a rate of an average of 7 per month. Today, only 4 are being issued on average a month.

Things are not much better for shallow water permits. While an average of 7.3 permits are being issued a month, about 14.7 permits per months were issued before the oil spill.

In addition, the number of days it is taking for a plan to be approved is now 115, compared to the historical average of 61 days. All deep-water plans that include any type of drilling activity must now undergo an environmental assessment process; for those plans requiring them in 2011, the average approval time is 235 days, significantly higher than the overall average approval time. Additionally, in 2011, 37 percent of plans submitted to BOEMRE are being approved, or about half of the historical 73.4 percent approval rate. At a St. Tammany West Chamber of Commerce meeting earlier this year, Sam Giberga, senior vice president and general counsel of Hornbeck Offshore Service said the typical cost of a well is $120 million. The success rates of wells is about 15 percent. “You’ve got to drill a lot wells to get oil,” said Giberga.

“Companies are dying every day,” he said. “Each barrel of oil that is used has to be replaced and it is getting harder and more expensive to replace it.” Giberga said that from the first leasing of the territory to a working, producing drilling rig is about five years. Plans must be approved, testing and explorations are done long before the rig is built. Therefore, even though the statistics that are released show a permit has been issued, this does not mean a rig will suddenly appear and produce oil.

In fact, some of those permits that have been given since the moratorium was declared over last October are permits that are being re-issued from last year, not new wells that can drill that day and oil will flow. Since last October, only four drilling plans have been approved. There is a backlog of plans pending approval for both deepwater and shallow water in exploration and development.

With the new regulations that have been issued by the executive branch, new sources of conflict are arising because of environment assessments that are now required for all permits, spurring environmental groups for the first time regarding drilling in the Gulf of Mexico.

There is a lot of confusion over the new regulations. “There exists now a cloud over the industry. Do we need to rebuild existing structure? What kinds of adjustment must be made? Other questions entering the minds of the industry are what’s coming into the future?” asked Giberga. When so much capital is needed prior to realizing any return, companies are asking if it’s worth it.

The lack of drilling is also affecting other industries. “Shutting down rigs has caused a ripple effect,” said Giberga. “There is a web of infrastructure that depends upon this industry, and if the assets leave, they won’t be coming back… There is a direct threat to companies and the country at large.”

Sadly, many states around the country still don’t understand the plight of the industry in the Gulf. For one thing, Giberga confirmed that it is true that other countries are drilling in areas of the Gulf not regulated by the United States. In other words, drills from Mexico, Venezeula and other countries can drill in other parts of the Gulf and could cause a spill due to lack of safety or poor decisions that would still effect the United States’ coastlines, not to mention the economy.

The affects of the new regulations on permits and plans and the long range energy economy will be seen for many years to come. Meanwhile, the permits are being approved—very slowly.

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Obama’s obligation to free up Gulf oil

More oil-drilling permits would bolster economy and decrease deficit

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By Lori LeBlanc
The Washington Times

One year ago last week, President Obama lifted his moratorium on deepwater drilling that five months earlier had halted operations on 33 rigs producing energy in the Gulf of Mexico. Since then, the industry has worked tirelessly to comply with new federal regulations and permitting requirements, while independently developing and implementing operating practices designed to further enhance safety and environmental protection on deepwater rigs. Yet a full year after the moratorium was lifted, federal permitting for drilling in the Gulf continues to greatly lag behind America’s demand – and capacity – for domestic energy development.

Every day, thousands of Americans whose livelihoods depend on a healthy Gulf energy industry feel the impact of the Gulf slowdown through lost wages, delayed jobs and a general sense of unpredictability about the future of an industry they count on to put food on the table. Local, state and federal government budgets also feel the impact through decreased sales tax and royalty revenue. The Gulf energy industry stands ready and waiting to provide jobs to a nation desperately in need of them. It’s high time to put American energy back to work.

In the wake of the Gulf spill, industry and government have collaborated in an unprecedented effort to rethink and re-engineer safety and response procedures and capabilities in the Gulf of Mexico. Workers are ready to get back to work fueling this nation. The rest lies in the hands of the Department of the Interior, whose regulators verify compliance and issue permits for exploration and drilling operations. Unfortunately, this permitting process continues to move at a pace that does not reflect an industry’s capability to invest and create good-paying jobs.

Permits are essential to the industry’s viability. Since the deepwater moratorium was lifted, only 14 permits have been issued for unique new wells allowing operators to drill to full depth for the purpose of production. For such a capital-intensive industry, where each new deepwater drill ship costs about $1 billion and employs hundreds of workers, those 14 permits over an entire year are simply insufficient to meet production demand or even to keep rigs in the Gulf. Of the original 33 rigs affected by the moratorium, 10 have left the Gulf in favor of markets where permitting is more predictable and transparent. Given the time and expense required to move these floating factories, it’s unlikely they’ll return anytime soon.

The most glaring loss, however, is the significant job opportunities forsaken each and every day as the permitting slowdown lingers. A recent study by IHS CERA concluded that a more-efficient and timely permitting process could create more than 200,000 new jobs in the United States, one-third of which would be generated outside the Gulf region in states like California, Florida, Illinois, Pennsylvania and New York. In today’s world, that amounts to a stimulus package in itself – and one that doesn’t require American taxpayers to foot the bill.

In fact, a healthy Gulf industry puts money back into the pockets of American taxpayers via revenue flows to the U.S. Treasury. The offshore industry paid $8.3 billion in royalties and $9.4 billion in new lease bids in 2008. In 2010, those numbers shrank to $4 billion in royalties and $979 million in lease bids. While the numbers for 2011 aren’t in yet, they’re likely on track with 2010 figures. Yet, according to the IHS CERA study, an industry operating under an improved permitting process could generate $12 billion in tax and royalty revenues by 2012.

The last ripple effect of the permitting slowdown may not pinch Americans today, but it has the potential to hit our pocketbooks in the months and years to come. By allowing rigs to depart the Gulf and discouraging the large-scale investment necessary to meet our future energy needs, our government’s lack of urgency to restoring Gulf energy puts us all in a precarious position. If and when we decide to harness the true potential of the Gulf, we may find that the investment and equipment simply isn’t there. This translates to greater reliance on foreign suppliers, less control of our own energy supplies, and living in the hope that unforeseen political developments somewhere overseas don’t push prices at the pump even higher.

The Gulf has a lot to offer Americans: jobs, revenue and a valuable domestic energy supply. A multitude of American workers are motivated to get back to work today. Virtually every American stands to gain by encouraging investment in domestic energy production. It’s time for our government to clear the permitting bottlenecks for Gulf drilling activity and get this nation back to work with American energy.

Lori LeBlanc is the executive director of the Gulf Economic Survival Team.

 Source

Breaking Precedent: Oil Firms Face Liability Protection Challenges

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By gCaptain Staff

HOUSTON —The U.S. government broke precedent by issuing citations to contractors Halliburton Co. and Transocean Ltd. in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, along with rig operator BP PLC.

While now facing greater scrutiny from regulators, contractors in the oil-service industry have considerable liability protection to fight the citations and any subsequent fines, legal experts say. They also have enough market muscle to strengthen liability protection in their contracts with oil companies.

Previously, U.S. regulators have held the rig operator responsible for whatever happens under its watch. The operator hired contractors, who perform drilling, seismic or cementing operations and whose contracts protected them from any liability.

That was upended by the Deepwater Horizon mishap in April 2010, which resulted in 11 deaths, the biggest accidental marine oil spill in history, and tens of billions of dollars in costs. BP said blame also falls on Halliburton, which was in charge of cementing the failed well shut, and Transocean, the drilling contractor that owned the Deepwater Horizon rig. U.S. investigations have widely cast the blame among all three companies.

The citations, issued Wednesday, set a precedent for holding contractors at least partially responsible for such accidents, and may increase the contractors’ exposure to civil suits from anyone claiming damages from the spill, analysts said.

The contractors have pledged to fight the accusations. Halliburton said that it is fully protected against penalties and losses from the Deepwater Horizon incident by its contract with BP. Transocean also said it intends to appeal.

However, if the courts determine that the government has the right to issue a citation to oil-service contractors, there is no contract that will protect them from the fine, according to Larry Nettles, an environmental attorney with Vinson & Elkins, a Houston law firm. “In most jurisdictions the courts do not allow indemnification for fines and penalties, because it defeats the purpose,” which is to punish bad behavior, Mr. Nettles said.

Still the industry is expected to bulk up its contracts even more in the wake of the regulators’ action, legal experts say, to get as much liability protection as possible. The contractors currently have considerable bargaining power to win such new concessions from rig operators on contract protection. Relatively high oil prices have led to a shortage of drilling crews and have put oilfield services at a premium, giving the contractors the upper hand in negotiations.

“When oil prices are high and there’s lots of activity, service contractors can drive a very hard bargain,” said Owen Anderson, a professor of law specializing in energy at the University of Oklahoma.

(c) 2011 Dow Jones & Company, Inc.

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Original Article

U.S. Legislators Want Repsol to Leave Cuba

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Thirty-four U.S. lawmakers on Wednesday asked the Spanish oil company Repsol to keep out of Cuban waters, saying the firm’s pending offshore drilling plans would support the Castro regime and “bankroll the apparatus that violently crushes dissent.”

“The decaying Cuban regime is desperately reaching out for an economic lifeline, and it appears to have found a willing partner in Repsol to come to its rescue,” said the author of a letter to the company, Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla.

The company says it could begin exploratory drilling as soon as December, a prospect that has the Florida and federal governments scrambling to develop contingency plans for a spill even as many Floridians have fresh memories of last year’s BP spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

“We are working on spill response and we’re working with the federal, state and local agencies – very closely,” said U.S. Coast Guard spokeswoman Marilyn Fajardo.

The possibility of exploratory drilling also has federal agencies grappling with the international and political implications on the U.S. embargo with Cuba.

Ros-Lehtinen, the chairwoman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, warned Repsol in the letter that any drilling operations it conducts in Cuban waters could provide direct financial benefit to the Castro dictatorship. The company’s partnership with the Cuban regime also could violate U.S. law and may run afoul of pending legislation in Congress, she said.

Recently, representatives from several industry and environmental groups traveled to Cuba to check in on the country’s offshore plans. They included Lee Hunt, the chief executive of the International Association of Drilling Contractors, and William Reilly, a former EPA administrator and co-chairman of the White House task force that investigated last year’s BP oil spill.

The group also included Richard Sears, the former vice president of deepwater drilling for Shell, and Dan Whittle, an attorney for the Environmental Defense Fund.

Repsol spokesman Kristian Rix said the company had no comment on the letter from Congress.

The company, which has U.S. operations that include leases in the Arctic waters off the northern Alaska coastline, is in the process of bringing a drilling rig to Cuba.

Repsol in January 2010 signed a lease contract with the Italian energy company Saipem for drilling equipment. Repsol on its website describes the equipment as complying “with all the technical requirements and all the limitations established by the U.S. administration for drilling operations in Cuba.”

The Republican-led House Natural Resources Committee had scheduled a hearing on drilling in Cuban waters for last week, but it was postponed after Obama administration officials said they weren’t yet prepared to outline their overall response to offshore drilling in Cuba.

Some Republican members of the committee have complained in the past about Cuba’s ability to drill so close to the U.S. coastline even as a 125-mile buffer zone remains in place in U.S. waters off of most of Florida’s coast.

The congressional letter drew bipartisan support, with Florida Republican Reps. Mario Diaz-Balart, David Rivera, Tom Rooney, Vern Buchanan, Dennis Ross and Sandy Adams signing onto it; they were joined by Democrats Ted Deutch, Frederica Wilson and Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

Also signing the letter were: Rep. Dan Burton, R-Ind.; Rep. Steve Austria, R-Ohio; Rep. Joe Baca, D-Calif.; Rep. Paul Broun, R-Ga.; Rep. John Carter, R-Texas; Rep. John Barrow, D-Ga.; Rep. Robert Andrews, D-N.J.; Rep. Kurt Schrader, D-Ore.; Rep. Tim Murphy, R-Pa.; Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, R-Wash.; Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash.; Rep. Daniel Lipinski, D-Ill.; Rep. Heath Shuler, D-N.C.; Rep. Candice Miller, R-Mich.; Del. Pedro Pierluisi, D-Puerto Rico; Rep. Frank Pallone, D-N.J.; Rep. Jean Schmidt, R-Ohio; Rep. Brian Higgins, D-N.Y.; Rep. Thaddeus McCotter, R-Mich.; Rep. Steven Rothman, D-N.J.; Rep. Michael Grimm, R-N.Y.; Rep. Jason Altmire, D-Pa.; and Rep. Edward Royce, R-Calif.

By Erika Bolstad (Miami Herald)

Original Article

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